ACT III.

When the curtain goes up again, it is seen that the stage hands have shifted the bit of scenery used in the last part, and have rigged up instead at the back of the stage a drop, with some trees, and one or two wings. A portion of a fountain basin is visible. The Mother is sitting on the Right with the two children by her side. The Son is on the same side, but away from the others. He seems bored, angry, and full of shame. The Father and The Step-Daughter are also seated towards the Right front. On the other side (Left) are the actors, much in the positions they occupied before the curtain was lowered. Only the Manager is standing up in the middle of the stage, with his hand closed over his mouth in the act of meditating.

THE MANAGER (shaking hit shoulders after a brief pause). Ah yes: the second act! Leave it to me, leave it all to me as we arranged, and you'll see! It'll go fine!

THE STEP-DAUGHTER. Our entry into his house (indicates Father) in spite of him (indicates the Son) . . .

THE MANAGER (out of patience). Leave it to me, I tell you!

THE STEP-DAUGHTER. Do let it be dear, at any rate, that it is in spite of my wishes.

The MOTHER (from her corner, shaking her head). For all the good that's come of it . . .

THE STEP-DAUGHTER (turning towards her quickly). It doesn't matter. The more harm done us, the more remorse for him.

THE MANAGER (impatiently). I understand! Good Heavens! I understand! I'm taking it into account.

-56-

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Three Plays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Prefatory Note v
  • Contents xi
  • Six Characters in Search Of An Author - (sei Personaggi in Cerca D'Autore) A Comedy in the Making 1
  • Act II 30
  • Act III 56
  • "Henry Iv." (enrico Quarto) - A Tragedy in Three Acts 73
  • Act I 75
  • Act II 110
  • Act III 135
  • Right You Are! (if You Think So) (così è, Se VI Pare!) - A Parable in Three Acts 149
  • Act II 187
  • Act III 208
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