ACT II.

Councillor Agazzi's study in the same house. Antique furnishings with old paintings on the walls. A portière over the rear entrance and over the door to the left which opens into the drawing room shown in the first act. To the right a substantial fireplace with a big mirror above the mantel. A flat top desk with a telephone. A sofa, armchairs, straight back chairs, etc.

As the curtain rises Agazzi is shown standing beside his desk with the telephone receiver pressed to his ear. Laudisi and Sirelli sit looking at him expectantly.

AGAZZI. Yes, I want Centuri. Hello hello . . . Centuri? Yes, Agazzi speaking. That you, Centuri? It's me, Agazzi. Well? (He listens for some time). What's that? Really? (Again he listens at length). I understand, but you might go at the matter with a little more speed . . . (Another long pause). Well, I give up! How can that possibly be? (A pause). Oh, I see, I see . . . (Another pause). Well, never mind, I'll look into it myself. Goodbye, Centuri, goodbye! (He lays down the receiver and steps forward on the stage).

SIRELLI (eagerly). Well?

AGAZZI. Nothing! Absolutely nothing!

SIRELLI. Nothing at all?

AGAZZI. You see the whole blamed village was wiped out. Not a house left standing! In the collapse of the town hall, followed by a fire, all the records of the place seem to have been lost--births, deaths, marriages, everything.

SIRELLI. But not everybody was killed. They ought to be able to find somebody who knows them.

-187-

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Three Plays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Prefatory Note v
  • Contents xi
  • Six Characters in Search Of An Author - (sei Personaggi in Cerca D'Autore) A Comedy in the Making 1
  • Act II 30
  • Act III 56
  • "Henry Iv." (enrico Quarto) - A Tragedy in Three Acts 73
  • Act I 75
  • Act II 110
  • Act III 135
  • Right You Are! (if You Think So) (così è, Se VI Pare!) - A Parable in Three Acts 149
  • Act II 187
  • Act III 208
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