Slavery, Law, and Politics: The Dred Scott Case in Historical Perspective

By Don E. Fehrenbacher | Go to book overview

11
In the Stream of History

Dred Scott, after his eleven-year struggle for freedom, lived only sixteen months as a free man. He and his family were transferred by the Chaffees to Taylor Blow in May 1857 and promptly manumitted. The Scotts remained in St. Louis, Dred working as a hotel porter and his wife Harriet, as a laundress. According to newspaper reports, Eliza and Lizzie ran away for a time but had returned home by 1858. A local newspaper described Scott as "a small, pleasant-looking negro," with a moustache and "imperial" beard, dressed in a suit of "seedy black," and looking "somewhat the worse for wear and tear." Missouri law required that Dred and Harriet post bond of $1000 for good behavior in order to continue living in the state. This they did on May 4, 1858, with Taylor Blow acting as security. Soon, however, Dred was stricken with consumption, and he died on September 17. Press accounts of his death were generally brief, but some editors took time to reflect on the fame that had enveloped this obscure black man and on the significance of his day in court. "In ages yet to come," said the New York Herald, " Dred Scott and the decision which bears his name will be familiar words in the mouth of the ranting demagogue in rostrum and pulpit, and of the student of political history."

Scott was buried in the St. Louis Wesleyan Cemetery, which within a decade became a casualty of urban expansion and was

-295-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Slavery, Law, and Politics: The Dred Scott Case in Historical Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - Slavery and Race in the American Constitutional System 7
  • 2 - Expansion and Slavery in National Politics 41
  • 3 - Toward Judicial Resolution 72
  • 4 - The Taney Court and Judicial Power 102
  • 5 - The Dred Scott Case in Missouri 121
  • 6 - Before the Supreme Court 151
  • 7 - The Opinion of the Court 183
  • 8 - Concurrence, Dissent, and Public Reaction 214
  • 9 - The Lecompton and Freeport Connections 244
  • 10 - Not Peace but a Sword 273
  • 11 - In the Stream of History 295
  • Selected Books for Further Reading 309
  • Index 313
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 326

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.