The Coming of the Revolution, 1763-1775

By Lawrence Henry Gipson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7
The Stamp Act Resisted

WHAT men in the past have believed to be true may well be as important to the historian as the actual truth. Keeping this in mind, we should examine the Stamp Act crisis, being careful to distinguish between the assumptions of fact which impelled people to act and the facts themselves.

Let us begin with the facts. As John Adams saw clearly, for over a century prior to 1764 the inhabitants of the colonies had been indirectly taxed by Parliament for the support of the Empire through the operation of the Navigation and Trade Laws. Writing as late as 1774, he conceded:

Great Britain has confined all our trade to herself. We are willing she should, so far as it can be for the good of the Empire. . . . We are obliged to take from Great Britain commodities that we could purchase cheaper elsewhere. This difference is a tax upon us for the good of the Empire.1

Furthermore, the colonists had had their internal affairs regulated by many acts passed by Parliament after the latter had assumed the chief prerogative powers of the Crown in 1689. Nevertheless, this was the first time they had been called upon by Parliament to pay into the receipt of the British Exchequer money raised within the colonies without consent of their assemblies.2 They were therefore

____________________
1
C. F. Adams (ed.), The Works of John Adams . . . (10 vols., Boston, 1850-56), IV, 46.
2
Virginians, however, were required by act of assembly in 1658 to pay into the Exchequer 2s. on every hogshead of tobacco before it could be exported,

-85-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Coming of the Revolution, 1763-1775
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 306

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.