16
THE "TERRIBLE SENATOR FROM MASSACHUSETTS" -- AT HOME

Celebrities usually treasure their privacy and show themselves to friends and family in a way the world never sees. Francis Grund could write about "the terrible Senator from Massachusetts," but Priscilla Tyler, the president's coquettish daughter-in-law, remembered the "enchanting nonsense" of Webster's dinner conversation and how, after she fainted at her first White House banquet, Webster tried to carry her away from the table while the president poured ice water over them both. Departing from that table in soggy disarray, he continued to be one of the most sought-after dinner guests in Washington, as celebrated for his gossip and his knowledge of good food and wine as for his solemn pronouncements about statecraft.

Despite his reputation for being cold and haughty to strangers, Webster was naturally gregarious and always enjoyed himself in good society. John Kenyon, the intimate of almost every major literary figure in England and a masterful host, remembered Webster "because the man was so genial, so social, so affectionate, so much disposed to talk about prose or verse or fishing or shooting or fine greensward, or great trees, or to enter into common chat about daily things."

Although at ease with the powerful and wealthy on either side of the ocean, he did not forget old friends whose lives had turned out less successfully than his own. A Mrs. Fuller, who had known Webster in her youth, wrote that her family had fallen on hard times after her husband was caught embezzling funds in a Boston bank. The senator gave Mr. Fuller a stern lec-

-210-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Daniel Webster
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 338

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.