The New Deal: The National Level

By John Braeman; Robert H. Bremner et al. | Go to book overview

James Holt


The New Deal and the
American Anti-Statist Tradition

WITHIN A YEAR OF FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT'S FIRST INAUGURATION AS president of the United States, a vociferous and apparently powerful conservative opposition had launched a vigorous assault on the new administration's programs. Though all kinds of charges were made against the New Deal from the right, one basic theme pervaded the rhetoric of conservatives during the 1930s and gave coherence to their indictment. The expansion of federal power under the auspices of the Roosevelt administration, they repeated endlessly, was undermining individual freedom and enterprise in the United States. Americans had enjoyed greater freedom and greater prosperity than any other people because in the United States men had been given the greatest possibile opportunity to work out their lives with a minimum of restraint and coercion. Freedom could be misused, and occasionally government, preferably at the state or local level, was required to step in and correct abuses. But the dead hand of government could never be a substitute for the hard work and individual initiative of free men. Prosperity would only return to the United States and freedom would only be preserved if the New Dealers would abandon their bureaucratic, socialistic, spendthrift schemes, which were shackling the energies and undermining the confidence of liberty-loving Americans.

It was not only Liberty Leaguers and business rhetoricians who based their critique of the New Deal on this anti-statist, individualistic credo. Even Republican politicians who were regarded as "moderate" or "lib-

-27-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The New Deal: The National Level
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 341

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.