Germany, a Companion to German Studies

By Jethro Bithell | Go to book overview

link is one of the great dangers now to be reckoned with; the hope of its frustration rests in the ineradicable Roman Catholicism of Austria and the shiftiness of Italy.

Any outside historian distributing light and shadow over the Nazi picture is likely to leave an impression of gloom. There is a temptation to compare the present attempt to redeem a galling defeat with the heroic regeneration which closed the Napoleonic Wars. The spirit which animates both is that of Kant's categorical imperative: ich kann, denn ich muss. The national regeneration of 1813 left the mind free, more free than it had ever been; its very essence was criticism of government; it was the mind of independent thinkers constraining the government, not the government machine destroying, for the sake of the machine, the activity of individual minds; and for that very reason the rehabilitation of the nation and the race was glorified by a burst of splendour in literature and philosophy, whereas today literature and philosophy are forced to flow in channels made by a government to whom literature and philosophy and all other arts, and science itself, and (if they can get their way) even religion, are merely means of propaganda. The struggle is, therefore, between spirit and the machine. History has no sense except as the record of the victory of the spirit of man. E pur si muove. . . .


BIBLIOGPAPHY TO CHAPTER V

Bartlett, Vernon. Nazi Germany Explained. Gollancz, London, 1933

Braun, Otto. Von Weimar zu Hitler. Europa-Verlag, Zurich and New York, 1940

Clark, R. T. The Fall of the German Republic. Allen & Unwin, London, 1935

Fabricius, Hans. Geschichte der nationalsozialistischen Bewegung. Berlin, 1935

Heiden, Konrad. A History of National Socialism. Methuen, 1934

Hitler, Adolf. Mein Kampf. 1925-26

Papen, Franz von. Der Wahrheit eine Gasse. Paul List, Munich, 1952

Reynolds, R. T. Prelude to Hitler. London, 1933

Roberts, Stephen H. The House that Hitler built. Methuen, 1937

Rosenberg, Alfred. Houston Stewart Chamberlain als Verkünder und Begründer einer deutschen Zukunft. Munich, 1927

Rosenberg, Arthur. History of the German Republic. Methuen, 1936

Severing, Carl. Mein Lebensweg. 2 vols. Greven, Cologne, 1950

Wheeler-Bennett, J. W. Hindenburg: The Wooden Titan. Macmillan, 1936

-180-

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