Germany, a Companion to German Studies

By Jethro Bithell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII

GERMAN MUSIC

THE recorded story of German music opens with the Minnesänger, who were the Teutonic counterpart of the Troubadours, and first became widely known in the reign of the Emperor Frederick Barbarossa(( 1152-90; see pp.226ff., 43, 45). It is continued by that of the Meistersinger (see pp. 229, 478), guilds whose members were not of noble birth as the Minnesänger had been, but mostly citizens who graduated through the five stages of Schüler, Schülerfreund, Sänger, Dichter, and Meister. They inherited a fine tradition, but interpreted it with a somewhat pedantic stiffness which led to a rapid decline in quality. Moreover, the invention of new melodies was discouraged by the practice of composing new poems to the old ones, some of which did duty constantly, and not always for congenial texts. Four of these tunes were known as gekrönte Töne, including one by Frauenlob (see p. 275), and another by Heinrich von Mugelîn which has become very familiar through Wagner's use of it in his music-drama, 'Die Meistersinger'.

Contemporaneously with the Meistersinger, another element in German music began to assert itself, at first so humbly that none could have foreseen that from its ranks would emerge the most remarkable dynasty of musicians history has ever known. This was the so-called town-pipers. Originally wayfaring musicians, in the thirteenth century they had begun to band themselves in guilds, and thereby succeeded gradually in raising their social status. Such a guild was, for instance, the Brotherhood of St. Nicholas, established in Vienna in 1288. These guilds, which came to be known as town-pipers, may be looked upon as the ancestors of the town orchestras of later times. But of even greater interest is the fact that Hans Bach, the 'Spielmann', was apprenticed to Caspar Bach, town-piper of Gotha, and that other members of the Bach family followed the same calling. Johann Sebastian Bach was the Spielmann's great-grandson.

But we are anticipating. Whilst first Minnesänger, then Meistersinger and town-pipers were serving the popular taste in music, elsewhere the art itself was being revolutionized by the early polyphonists. But, though in Bach polyphonic art was to reach its culmination, Germany played but

-454-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Germany, a Companion to German Studies
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 578

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.