George Washington: A Biography - Vol. 1

By Douglas Southall Freeman | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII
"AND HAD MY COMMISSION TAKEN FROM ME OR . . ."
(JULY 5, 1754-NOVEMBER 15, 1754)

WHEN THE SURVIVORS of Fort Necessity were counted at the bivouac on the morning of July 5, 1754, they numbered 293 officers and men.1 By the time it reached Wills Creek on the 8th or 9th,2 the Virginia Regiment had been reduced by death, wounds, detachment, lameness and desertion to 165 rank and file.3 George's dead numbered thirteen and his wounded fifty-four. Besides the eleven uninjured men detached at the scene of the capitulation to care for those who could not be moved, twenty-nine had been left footsore on the road. Nineteen were missing and either had deserted or had lost their lives while straying from the column.4 Total killed finally were counted at thirty and the wounded at seventy for the entire force,5 which, at the beginning of the expedition, had consisted of about 400 of all ranks.

George and most of his officers soon recovered from the physical strains of the battle and the retreat, but the surviving private soldiers of the Virginia Regiment less quickly responded to rest and full rations. This exhaustion manifestly might lead to demoralization, but, in retrospect, there had been little in the conduct of the men that should shame them or their Colonel. Until the evening of July 3, when they had broken into the rum, the soldiers of the colonial command had behaved well and had fought with courage. The men of Mackay's Independent

____________________
1
MS morning return; 1 Papers of G, W., LC.
2
They were there July 9, because the "return" of the various Companies was made at Wills Creeks. To get there on the evening of the 8th, the men would have been compelled to march seventeen miles a day on the 5th-8th. Arrival on the 9th would have presupposed a daily march of thirteen miles. The number of lame men left on the road indicates a swift march, which was possible for men who had no wagons, but the doubt concerning the exact dates has not been resolved.
3
Return of July 9, 1754 in Toner, ed., Washington's Journal of 1754, p. 172-80. Cf. 1 V 278 ff. The return of July 23, 1754, in 1 Hamilton, 29, included a total of 240.
4
Ibid. One man was reported a prisoner in addition to the two hostages.
5
Dinwiddie to the Lords of Trade, July 24, 1754; 1 Din., 241. As the fatalities in the Virginia Regiment were thirteen and the wounded fifty-seven, it is highly improbable that Mackay's Independent Company should have had seventeen killed and only thirteen wounded. This disproportion suggests that some of the figures given by Dinwiddie were estimates. According to later terminology, the figure thirty probably represented the total of "killed and died of wounds." Loss of Washington's papers in the confusion and plundering of Fort Necessity ( Toner, ed., op. cit., 181) made an accurate return difficult to prepare.

-412-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
George Washington: A Biography - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 554

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.