George Washington: A Biography - Vol. 1

By Douglas Southall Freeman | Go to book overview

was pursued in slightly different ways by William Fairfax, by William Beverley, and by Lord Fairfax himself. Patents for small tracts became more numerous. Side by side with this movement was a continuance of the grant or consolidation of large estates by men who loved wide acres and combined the ambitions of a baron with the greed of a land speculator. The system tended to stratify the society of Virginia, but before this was accomplished, the Revolution came and overthrew both the system and the society based on it.


APPENDIX 1-2

PART I
THF, FIRST PATENT OF THE PROPRIETARY

CHARLES R.

CHARLES THE SECOND by the grace of God King of England Scotland France and Ireland Defender of the faith &c. TO ALL to whome these presents shall come Greeting. WHEREAS wee have taken into Our Royall Consideracon the great propagation of the Christian faith, and the manifold benefitts arising to the Church of God, together with the wellfare of multitudes of Our Loyall Subiects by the undertakings and vigorous prosecution of Plantations in fforeign parts, and particularly in our Dominions of America AND whereas wee are informed by Our Right trusty and welbeloved Raph Lord Hopton, Baron of Stratton, Henry Lord Jermyn Baron of St Edmunds Bury, John Lord Culpeper Baron of Thoresway, Sr John Barkeley, Sr William Norton [sic] Sr Dudley Wyatt & Thomas Culpeper Esqr.That all that intire Tract of Land, portion and Teritory lying in America, and bounded by, and within the heads of Tappahannocke als Rappahanocke and Quircough or Patawomecke Rivers, the Courses of the said Rivers and Chesapayoake Bay, the said Rivers themselves, and all Islands within the said Rivers togeather with the ffishing of the same are in Our free guift and disposicon, and that wee are intitled to the same, and every part and parcell thereof KNOWE ye therefore that wee for and in Consideracon of many faithfull services donne to Our late Royall ffather of blessed memory, and to Our selfe by the said Lord Hopton, Lord Jermyn, Lord Culpeper, Sr John Barkeley, Sr William Mortin [sic], Sr Dudley Wyatt and Thomas Culpeper HAVE of Our

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