George Washington: A Biography - Vol. 1

By Douglas Southall Freeman | Go to book overview
PAGE
3. Imports and Exports 165
4. The Adverse Balance of
Trade 167
5. The Rate of Exchange 168
X. Government 170
1. The Crown 170
2. Governor 170
3. Council 172
4. House of Burgesses 173
Colonial Finance 175
5. Judiciary 175
PAGE
a. County Court, crime
and punishment 175
b. General Court 180
c. Other Tribunals 180
6. Administrative Officers 181
7. The Militia 184
XI. Population and Domain 184
1. Estimates of Population 184
2. Domain 186
a. Boundary Disputes 186
b.The frontier 189

APPENDIX 1-9
CRITIQUE OF WASHINGTON'S JOURNAL OF 1754

PART OF A French translation of Washington's journal for the period Mch. 31-June 27, 1754, appeared in a book published in Paris during 1756 under the title, Mémoire contenant le précis des faits, avec leurs pièces justificatives pour servir de résponse aux observations envoyées par les ministres d'Angleterre dans les cours de l'Europe.

Issued to vindicate French occupation of the Ohio and to portray the British as the aggressors there, the Mémoire contained Pièces Justificatives in two divisions. Sixteen documents, French and British, constituted the first part, and thirteen made up the second. Journal du Major Washington was No. VIII of the first part. A copy of this pamphlet was found on a French prize ship, was brought to New York, and in 1757 was published in several editions. A London version of the same year was entitled The Conduct of the Late Ministry. This was reprinted as The Mystery Revealed.1

Washington said of the journal, as published: "I kept no regular one during that expedition; rough minutes of occurrences I certainly took and find them as certainly and strangely metamorphosed; some parts left out, which I remember were entered, and many things added that never were thought of; the names of men and things egregiously miscalled; and the whole of what

____________________
1
See Francis Parkman's note on the copy of the French original, now In the Harvard Library, given him by Jared Sparks. The copy of the same French text, owned by Thomas Jefferson, is among the treasures of the Library of Congress.

-540-

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