Women Politicians and the Media

By Maria Braden | Go to book overview

Chapter 13
MS. PRESIDENT?

THE PRESS WASN'T ALONE IN SHUNNING VICTORIA WOODHULL WHEN SHE RAN FOR president in 1872. Even Susan B. Anthony turned off the auditorium lights when Woodhull tried to address the National Woman Suffrage Association. Soon afterward, lacking the support of the suffrage movement, Woodhull's candidacy fell apart. Backed by the Equal Rights Party, a coalition of socialists, feminists, Spiritualists, and communists, Woodhull advocated sexual freedom for women and attacked marriage as an institution that enslaves women. America wasn't ready for her.

Voters wouldn't be any more eager to embrace someone like Woodhull today than they were more than a century ago. The media would probably ignore her as not being a "viable" candidate. That's understandable. But in general the media have been reluctant to treat the idea of a woman president seriously, whether she's a radical extremist or an experienced legislator. Often the media seem slower to change than the people they are said to mirror.

Surveys of the acceptability of women in public office have generally indicated that the lower the office, the more willing people would be to fill it with a woman. But the political climate has been shifting. Among the more dramatic indicators of change are responses to a Gallup question that has been regularly repeated: "If your party nominated a woman for president, would you vote for her if she qualified for the job?" In 1937, 31 percent of a national sample said they would but 65 percent said they would not. By 1952 public sentiment had tilted the other way, with a 52 to 44 percent majority saying they would vote for a woman. That proportion climbed to 66 to 29 percent in 1971 and was up to 78 to 17 percent by 1984. In 1992, a Roper poll asked Americans, "Stop me if I name an office for which you would not vote for a woman." A strong majority accepted the idea of a woman chief executive, but the number who said they would not vote for a woman presidential candidate or were undecided was 32 percent, up substantially from previous polls.

When only women were surveyed in the 1972 Virginia Slims American Women's opinion poll, a majority were ready to accept a woman candidate for

-183-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women Politicians and the Media
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Chapter 1 - Going Forward, Walking Backward 1
  • Chapter 2 - The First and Only 19
  • Chapter 3 - The "Glamour Girls" of Congress 38
  • Chapter 4 - A Rose by Any Other Name 50
  • Chapter 5 - The Push for Equal Rights 63
  • Chapter 6 - Battling Bella 79
  • Chapter 7 - Are We There Yet? 89
  • Chapter 8 - Almost a Bridesmaid 105
  • Chapter 9 - 1992 and All That 119
  • Chapter 10 - The Kamikaze Campaign and Politics as Usual 134
  • Nearing the Millennium - Chapter 11 144
  • Chapter 12 - From a Woman's Point of View 166
  • Chapter 13 - Ms. President? 183
  • Notes 198
  • Selected - Bibliography 219
  • Index 225
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 238

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.