EPILOGUE

ENGLISH readers, if they have followed thus far the path of the Spanish Reformers of 1868, must have noticed now and again an echo of something which they will have heard before. Though the English influences on the group have been pointed out (as have the French influences on Spanish republicanism and the German influences on Spanish philosophy), the echo of ideas which seem to be "English" cannot be explained away as mere influence. Anyone to-day who reads Giner, Cossío or Azcárate will recognize in them something of the liberal and ascetic creed of the best of his own schoolmasters; for Giner and Cossío were, first and last and above all, excellent schoolmasters who would have been valuable in this or any other country but were more valuable than ever in their own, where until lately the good schoolmaster was liable to prosecution.

For these reasons, ideas like those of the Spanish Reformers of 1868 can sometimes be found in the writings of English contemporaries with whom they had no direct contact. They may be found, for instance, without leaving the precincts of Cambridge.

"I can't make you geologists", Adam Sedgwick would say, "but I can fire your imaginations." And Montagu Butler, the late Master of Trinity, urging the importance of the spirit and the necessity for intellectual enthusiasm, would ask:

"Is it with the prudential calculation of self-interest or with the lover-like transport of affection? Do you love it for what it gives, or for what it is?"

No less might the "eager intellectual brotherhood" of which Don Francisco was the acknowledged centre have heard him speak with unwonted bitterness of "intellectual infidelity, the gradual loss of faith in the higher things of the mind".

Even more appropriate, more true to the Spanish Reformers, are the words in which Frederic William Maitland commemorated Henry Sidgwick. Like Sidgwick, Giner was

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