The History of Medieval Europe

By Lynn Thorndike; James T. Shotwell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXXII
THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE: FINE ARTS AND VOYAGES OF DISCOVERY

THE Italian Renaissance is one of the great periods in the history of art. Artists of the first rank were too numerous to mention each individually here, and there was a vast output of masterpieces. In the palace of the popes at Rome paintings by old masters that would command a high price to-day were actually erased to make room for new creations. Artistic sensibility was widespread through the population. Both Church and State were eager patrons and employers of the artists, and the public appreciated their genius. In short, "Art was the oxygen of Renaissance life."

An epoch in the history of art

The chief contemporary account of the biographies of the artists of the Italian Renaissance is their Lives by Vasari, himself an artist at the close of the movement. His work aimed to do for the Italian artists what Plutarch Lives had done for the great statesmen and generals of classical antiquity. Vasari tried to cover too vast a field to attain critical accuracy in all the details of the lives of his heroes, and even his art criticism has often not met with modern approval. Recent investigators have gone back of his biographical essays, most of which are after all secondary sources, to family and state papers containing original bits of biographical information which enable them to rectify dates in the artists' careers or to revise Vasari's estimates of their personalities. Frescoes and canvases have been scrutinized with the help of photography and microscope, and thus lost masterpieces have been rediscovered or it has been found that this painting has been incorrectly attributed to that artist. Vasari, nevertheless, remains the foundation upon which such superior historical

Vasari's Lives

-597-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The History of Medieval Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 686

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.