The History of Twelve Days, July 24th to August 4th, 1914: Being an Account of the Negotiations Preceding the Outbreak of War Based on the Official Publications

By J. W. Morley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
SERBIA AND AUSTRIA

I

IT was August in the year 1913. The long-drawn crisis in the Balkans seemed at last over. The Treaty of Bucharest had been signed, and the Ambassadors, who for many months had been holding their conferences in London, were at last separating for their holidays. Sir Edward Grey, in giving an account of their work to the House of Commons, was able to say:

For some time meetings of the Ambassadors have been regarded as the symbol of the existence of the Concert of Europe, but we have happily reached the stage at which I trust the Concert of Europe is so firmly established that the mere fact that the meetings of the Ambassadors have adjourned for the holidays will raise no doubts as regards the health and well-being of the Concert of the Great Powers of Europe. On the contrary . . . I think every one who considers how startling and distressing and sudden have been the events of the last few weeks in the Balkan Peninsula, and yet that there have been none of those rumours as to the intentions of the Great Powers which we had in the earlier stages, will I think be convinced that at the present moment the relations between the Great Powers are not in a condition which threaten the peace of Europe or give rise for apprehension.

It is true, of course, that there has not been unanimity between the Great Powers. Any one who reads the Continental press will see that there is not unanimity on all points. The opinions expressed in the different countries on the merits of the different points of the Treaty of Bucharest differ; but there are no differences of opinion which show a tendency to divide the large groups of the Great Powers into opposing camps.1

It was indeed one of the most remarkable achievements of diplomacy. For thirty years it had been a constant fear that an

____________________
1
The Times, August 13, 1913.

-3-

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The History of Twelve Days, July 24th to August 4th, 1914: Being an Account of the Negotiations Preceding the Outbreak of War Based on the Official Publications
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xxiii
  • Part I 1
  • Chapter I - Serbia and Austria 3
  • Chapter II - Germany 40
  • Chapter III - Russia and Austria 62
  • Chapter IV - The Serbian Reply 84
  • Chapter V - Mediation 99
  • Chapter VI - German Efforts for Peace 144
  • Chapter VII - Declaration of War on Serbia 164
  • Chapter VIII - The Intervention of the Emperor 177
  • Chapter IX - Russian Mobilisation 202
  • Chapter X - Mediation Renewed 226
  • Chapter XI - The German Ultimatum 240
  • Chapter XII - Declaration of War on Russia 259
  • Chapter XIII - Declaration of War on France 267
  • Part II 287
  • Chapter XIV - Great Britain and the Entente Cordiale 289
  • Chapter XV - British Intervention 303
  • Chapter XVI - The Neutrality of Belgium 346
  • Chapter XVII - The Violation of Belgian Neutrality 370
  • Appendix A 391
  • Appendix B 393
  • Appendix C 399
  • Appendix D 402
  • Index 405
  • Documents Quoted 409
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