The History of Twelve Days, July 24th to August 4th, 1914: Being an Account of the Negotiations Preceding the Outbreak of War Based on the Official Publications

By J. W. Morley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
RUSSIA AND AUSTRIA

THE explanation of the German point of view will show that all now depended on the action of Russia. If she acquiesced things would go smoothly; if not, a grave international situation would arise. As Count Mensdorff said, "all would depend upon Russia," and Sir Edward Grey, "if the Austrian ultimatum did not lead to trouble between Austria and Russia I had no concern with it; I had heard nothing yet from St. Petersburg, but was very apprehensive of the view Russia would take of the situation."

We must now follow closely the action of Russia during the next two days.


I

The text of the Austrian Note reached St. Petersburg on the evening of Thursday, the 23rd, or in the early hours of Friday morning. The impression it made was very serious. As The Times says: "When the full text of the Austrian ultimatum was received, indignation became unbounded--public opinion is incensed at what is considered the outrageous, humiliating, brutal, and unjustifiable language of the Austrian ultimatum. Russian national sentiment would undoubtedly support the Government if mobilisation were decided."

It is clear that the Russian Government from the very first took a similar view. In order to understand this we must recall that the Austrian Government had deliberately misled them. Two days before the Ambassador at Vienna had seen Count Berchtold and had received from him an assurance "that the demands on Serbia would be thoroughly acceptable." On this he had gone away on leave.

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The History of Twelve Days, July 24th to August 4th, 1914: Being an Account of the Negotiations Preceding the Outbreak of War Based on the Official Publications
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xxiii
  • Part I 1
  • Chapter I - Serbia and Austria 3
  • Chapter II - Germany 40
  • Chapter III - Russia and Austria 62
  • Chapter IV - The Serbian Reply 84
  • Chapter V - Mediation 99
  • Chapter VI - German Efforts for Peace 144
  • Chapter VII - Declaration of War on Serbia 164
  • Chapter VIII - The Intervention of the Emperor 177
  • Chapter IX - Russian Mobilisation 202
  • Chapter X - Mediation Renewed 226
  • Chapter XI - The German Ultimatum 240
  • Chapter XII - Declaration of War on Russia 259
  • Chapter XIII - Declaration of War on France 267
  • Part II 287
  • Chapter XIV - Great Britain and the Entente Cordiale 289
  • Chapter XV - British Intervention 303
  • Chapter XVI - The Neutrality of Belgium 346
  • Chapter XVII - The Violation of Belgian Neutrality 370
  • Appendix A 391
  • Appendix B 393
  • Appendix C 399
  • Appendix D 402
  • Index 405
  • Documents Quoted 409
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