The History of Twelve Days, July 24th to August 4th, 1914: Being an Account of the Negotiations Preceding the Outbreak of War Based on the Official Publications

By J. W. Morley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
THE INTERVENTION OF THE EMPEROR

MEANWHILE the German Emperor, who at the beginning of the crisis had been away on his annual tour to Norway, had hurried back, and he reached Berlin on Sunday evening. This is announced in a curious telegram from Sir Horace Rumbold:

Emperor returns suddenly to-night, and Under Secretary of State says that Foreign Office regret this step, which was taken on His Majesty's own initiative. They fear that His Majesty's sudden return may cause speculation and excitement.1

What is the explanation of this? Perhaps it is to be found in the attitude which, as we have seen, was officially assumed by the Berlin Foreign Office. The whole matter was essentially local, it concerned Austria and Serbia alone; it was not in any way a European question. The sudden return of the Emperor might appear to be inconsistent with this view.

Never did greater responsibility rest on any man. It was not yet too late; there was still time to accept one of the many suggestions for mediation or for himself to make some proposal by which the whole affair could be settled by peaceable agreement. There was still time for a word of warning to Austria to stay her hand and allow a few more days for discussion. Peace could be had, but he was now the only man in Europe who could speak the decisive word.

There was much in his previous record and in the reputation which he had won, to cause hope that he would not fail on this occasion again to use his influence for peace, But there was one passage that might, if remembered, cause apprehension. Once before Austria had taken a forward move in the Balkans and

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1
E. 33.

-177-

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The History of Twelve Days, July 24th to August 4th, 1914: Being an Account of the Negotiations Preceding the Outbreak of War Based on the Official Publications
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xxiii
  • Part I 1
  • Chapter I - Serbia and Austria 3
  • Chapter II - Germany 40
  • Chapter III - Russia and Austria 62
  • Chapter IV - The Serbian Reply 84
  • Chapter V - Mediation 99
  • Chapter VI - German Efforts for Peace 144
  • Chapter VII - Declaration of War on Serbia 164
  • Chapter VIII - The Intervention of the Emperor 177
  • Chapter IX - Russian Mobilisation 202
  • Chapter X - Mediation Renewed 226
  • Chapter XI - The German Ultimatum 240
  • Chapter XII - Declaration of War on Russia 259
  • Chapter XIII - Declaration of War on France 267
  • Part II 287
  • Chapter XIV - Great Britain and the Entente Cordiale 289
  • Chapter XV - British Intervention 303
  • Chapter XVI - The Neutrality of Belgium 346
  • Chapter XVII - The Violation of Belgian Neutrality 370
  • Appendix A 391
  • Appendix B 393
  • Appendix C 399
  • Appendix D 402
  • Index 405
  • Documents Quoted 409
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