The History of Twelve Days, July 24th to August 4th, 1914: Being an Account of the Negotiations Preceding the Outbreak of War Based on the Official Publications

By J. W. Morley | Go to book overview

APPENDIX D

THE following despatch was published in the North German Gazette on the 12th of September. The following account is given of the manner in which it came into the hands of the German Foreign Office:

On the 31st of July a letter was posted in Berlin, addressed to Madame Clostermans, 107, Rue Froisoid, Brussels. As the Empire was declared in a state of war [Kriegszustand] on that day, and with this the forwarding of letters abroad ceased, the letter was returned to the Post Office with a note, "Detained on account of state of war." It remained there, and after the expiration of the regular period was officially opened in order to find out the name of the sender. In outer cover was found a second envelope addressed to "His Excellency Monsieur Davignon, Minister of Foreign Affairs." As the name of the writer was not given on this cover, that was also opened. Within was found an official report of the Belgian Chargé d'Affaires at St. Petersburg, M. B. de l'Escaille, on the political situation of July 30th, which, in consideration of its political importance, was forwarded by the General Post Office to the Foreign Office.

795402. ST. PETERSBURG, July 30, 1914.


THE POLITICAL SITUATION.

To His Excellency Monsieur Davignon, Minister of Foreign Affairs.

Sir,--Yesterday and the previous day passed in the expectation of events which must follow the declaration of war of Austria- Hungary against Serbia. The most contradictory reports were circulated without its being possible to distinguish what was true and what was false as regards the intentions of the Imperial [Russian] Government. It only remains indisputable that Germany has laboured here just as much as in Vienna to find some means of avoiding a general conflict, but that in this it has come on one side against the firm determination of the Vienna Cabinet not to draw back a step, and on the other side on the distrust of the St. Petersburg Cabinet as to the assurances of Austria- Hungary that she thinks only of punishing Serbia and not of seizing territory.

-402-

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The History of Twelve Days, July 24th to August 4th, 1914: Being an Account of the Negotiations Preceding the Outbreak of War Based on the Official Publications
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xxiii
  • Part I 1
  • Chapter I - Serbia and Austria 3
  • Chapter II - Germany 40
  • Chapter III - Russia and Austria 62
  • Chapter IV - The Serbian Reply 84
  • Chapter V - Mediation 99
  • Chapter VI - German Efforts for Peace 144
  • Chapter VII - Declaration of War on Serbia 164
  • Chapter VIII - The Intervention of the Emperor 177
  • Chapter IX - Russian Mobilisation 202
  • Chapter X - Mediation Renewed 226
  • Chapter XI - The German Ultimatum 240
  • Chapter XII - Declaration of War on Russia 259
  • Chapter XIII - Declaration of War on France 267
  • Part II 287
  • Chapter XIV - Great Britain and the Entente Cordiale 289
  • Chapter XV - British Intervention 303
  • Chapter XVI - The Neutrality of Belgium 346
  • Chapter XVII - The Violation of Belgian Neutrality 370
  • Appendix A 391
  • Appendix B 393
  • Appendix C 399
  • Appendix D 402
  • Index 405
  • Documents Quoted 409
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