Reminiscences of the Civil War

By John B. Gordon | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXI
MOVEMENTS AFTER SPOTTSYLVANIA

A surprising capture-Kind treatment received by prisoners-Five rainy days of inaction--Fighting resumed on May 18--Hancock's corps ordered to the assault-GeneralGrant's order to Meade. "Where Lee goes, there you will go also" -- How Lee turned the tables -- Fighting it out on this line all summer--Lee's men still resolute after the Wilderness.

AS Hancock's troops were driven out of our lines on the morning of the 12th, the commander of one of my regiments, Colonel Davant of the Thirty-eighth Georgia, became so enthused that he ran in pursuit ahead of his men, and passed some distance beyond the breastworks. A squad of Hancock's retreating men at once halted, and, in the quaint phraseology of the army, 69 quietly took him in." Davant, surprised to find himself in the hands of Hancock's bluecoats instead of in the company of his Confederate comrades, attempted to give notice to his men in the rear that he was captured. His adjutant, John Gordon Law, my first cousin, heard the colonel's call, and sprang forward through the thicket to aid him. Law was likewise captured, and was kept in prison to the end of the war. He is now a prominent minister of the Presbyterian Church, and delights to tell of the great kindness shown him by the guard to whose care he was assigned. The soldier in blue who guarded Law was a private, and had no possible use for a sword-belt; but he wanted it, nevertheless. Instead of taking it forcibly, he paid

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