Highways and Byways in Oxford and the Cotswolds

By Herbert A. Evans; Frederick Landseer Maur Griggs | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV

A BROKEN undulating region, full of ups and downs, is this North Oxfordshire country. With the exception of the Stour, which rises in Wigginton Heath, and the little brook which waters the village of Long Compton, the many rills the traveller has to cross all make their way southward to swell the volume of the Thames. Towards one of these, the Swale, I am taking my journey this morning, for it gives its name to a village which may boast one of the most interesting churches in the county. The church of Swalcliffe, like its neighbour at Tadmarton, has been respected by the restorer. You have no need to peer here and there with anxious eye to discover that you have not entered a spick-and-span erection of yesterday. The carved oak pews of the seventeenth century, the venerable arcades, the fine, open, timber roof, and the perpendicular chancel screen, which still retains traces of its original colouring, strike you at once, and the charm of the whole is enhanced by the warm tints of the native stone, and the flood of light which in the absence of objectionable glass the windows are still able to admit. Only in the chancel do we find scraped walls, and other traces of the enemy. The pews and pulpit were the gift of a branch of the Wykeham family, who long resided here; and the squire's house is still the property of their representative, while New College is the patron of the living. There are two curious features in the church which we must notice; one, a doorway in the jamb of one of the windows of the south

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Highways and Byways in Oxford and the Cotswolds
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Illustrations xiii
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 34
  • Chapter III 62
  • Chapter IV 80
  • Chapter V 99
  • Chapter VI 124
  • Chapter VII 146
  • Chapter VIII 172
  • Chapter IX 208
  • Chapter X 249
  • Chapter XI 275
  • Chapter XII 300
  • Chapter XIII 314
  • Chapter XIV 335
  • Chapter XV 353
  • Chapter XVI 375
  • Index 401
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