Doctors in Gray: The Confederate Medical Service

By H. H. Cunningham | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
Prison Hospitals

Establishment and Control

Most prison hospitals in the Confederacy, like the prisons themselves, were established in warehouses and factories. Since governmental policy dictated that, in general, such institutions be contained within a compact area--primarily for security reasons--they were not very large. All of the prison hospitals in Richmond and Danville, Virginia, were located in tobacco warehouses, and an interesting experiment at Petersburg in the same state saw one hospital used for both Union and Confederate prisoners. Mixing of Confederate and Union disabled also took place elsewhere, and "A Confederate soldier" in the Foard Hospital at Newnan, Georgia, protested at seeing the latter "receive courtesies the same as the wounded Confederates who has fought and suffered for his country and not against it." The Salisbury, North Carolina, prison hospital consisted of a two-story wooden structure located near the brick factory used for the prison. 1 At Andersonville, Georgia, the hospital was first located inside a seventeen-acre stockade, but it was moved later to a shady oak grove outside the enclosure. Andersonville's sick, to the extent possible, were accommodated in tents.

Hospitals for prisoners of war came to be placed on the same footing as all other Confederate States hospitals. With the exception of those in Cahaba, Alabama, and Andersonville, Millen, and Savannah, Georgia, late in the war, 2 they

____________________
1
A Northern prisoner referred to the Salisbury prison as "an obsolete cotton factory which some deluded capitalist once tried to establish here."
2
General John H. Winder was in charge of all prison hospitals in Alabama and Georgia, and such institutions were supervised by Isaiah H. White. The latter received reports from R. Randolph Stevenson at An

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