Capital Punishment: A World View

By James Avery Joyce | Go to book overview

INDEX
Abbas, Ferhat, 252
Abbott, Burton W., 159, 161, 169
Abolitionist ideas: ancient Hebrews, 60, Christian prelates, 63, Beccaria, 76, beginnings of abolition, 79-81. See also under United Nations and separate countries
Adam, Prof. Hugo, quoted, 169
Adams, John Quincy, 174
Addae, Miss,202
Advisory Council on the Treatment of Offenders, 143
Agrippa, 57
Ahmed, Begum, 223
Alabama: case of Jimmy Wilson, 156; method of execution, 167
Alaska, abolishes death penalty, 183
Albigensian Crusade, 64
Aldunate, Mr., 219
American League to Abolish Capital Punishment, 176
Ancel, Marc, 110
Andrew, John A., 174
Anglo-Saxons, and capital punishment, 61
Anhalt, 80
Anti-Gallows Societies, 174
Aquinas, St. Thomas, 62
Argentina, abolishes death penalty, 85
Argow, Mrs. Claire, 180
Arizona: abolition and reintroduction of death penalty, 87; method of execution, 167
Arkansas, methods of execution, 167,168
Asher, Miss Rosalie, 33
Asylums, 71
Augustine, St., 62
Australia: abolitionist trends in, 86; attitude in Capital Punishment debate in U.N., 211
Austria: oscillating policies in, 88; introduces draft resolution at U.N., 220
Baan, Dr. Pieter, 239
Bacon, Miss Alice, 181
Balch, Rev. William S., 174
Bandaranaike, S. W. R. D., 94
Barbarossa, Frederick, 64
Barnes, Dr. Harry Elmer, 27, 30, 35
Barnes and Teeters, New Horizons in Criminology, 52, 247
Baroody, Mr., 205
Baror, Mr., 224
Barry Mr. Justice, 144
Beccaria, Cesare de, On Crimes and Penalties, 76
Bedau, Prof., quoted, 179
Belgium: no non-military death sentences since 1863, 85; attitude in Capital Punishment debate in U.N., 202
Beloff, Nora, quoted, 108
Belsen, 65
Bendiner, Robert, 44
Benson George, 136

-280-

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