Diary of the American Revolution: From Newspapers and Original Documents - Vol. 2

By Frank Moore | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II.

May 1. THIS morning, at daylight, the American camp, which lay near the Crooked Billet,1 was surrounded with a body of the enemy, who appeared on all quarters. The scouts neglected last night to patrol the roads as they were ordered, but lay in camp till near day, though their orders were to leave it by two o'clock in the morning. On the disobedience of some officers of the scouts we have to lay our misfortunes.

Fight at the Crooked Billet.

The alarm was so sudden, we had scarcely time to mount our horses before the enemy was within musket shot of our quarters. We observed a party in our rear had got into houses and behind fences; their numbers appearing nearly equal to ours, we did not think it advisable to attack them in that situation, especially as another body appeared in our front to the east of the Billet; and not knowing what numbers we had to contend with, we thought it best to open our way under cover of a wood to the left of our camp, towards Colonel IIart's, for which our little party moved in columns, the baggage following in the rear. We had not passed far before our flanking parties began to change shot with the enemy, but kept moving on till we made the wood, when a party of both foot and horse came up the Biberry road, and attacked our right flank; the party from the Billet fell upon our rear; the horse, from the rear of our camp, came upon our left flank. A body of horse appearing in our front, we made a stand in the wood, and gave them some warm fires, which forced them to retire; their

____________________
Near Neshaminy Bridge.

-41-

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Diary of the American Revolution: From Newspapers and Original Documents - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Chapter I 3
  • Chapter II 41
  • Chapter III 93
  • Chapter IV 117
  • Chapter V 166
  • Chapter VI 215
  • Chapter VII 249
  • Chapter VIII 303
  • Chapter IX 362
  • Chapter X 434
  • Chapter XI 501
  • Index 529
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