The Rossetti-Macmillan Letters: Some 133 Unpublished Letters Written to Alexander Macmillan, F. S. Ellis, and Others, by Dante Gabriel, Christina, and William Michael Rossetti, 1861-1889

By Lona Mosk Packer | Go to book overview

PREFACE

When I was in London during 1958-60 gathering material for a biography of Christina Rossetti, I wrote to Macmillan & Co., inquiring whether the London firm had any correspondence from her, and was told there was a packet of letters in the files. The firm kindly gave me permission to examine, copy, and reproduce the material for publication. Much to my surprise, I found one hundred and twenty letters from Christina, William Michael, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti. Unpublished and unread, they had been preserved in the Macmillan archives for almost a century, unknown even to the present proprietors of the firm. Although I have drawn upon the correspondence in writing my biography and have published brief excerpts from it in articles, as a group the letters remain unpublished.

The correspondence covers the years from 1861 to 1889. Because with one exception, Macmillan published all Christina's volumes of poetry, by far the greater number of letters are written by her, sixty-eight, to be exact. William Michael, who published two books with Macmillan, is the author of twentyfive letters. The remaining twenty-seven are written by Dante Gabriel Rossetti. Although Macmillan was not his publisher and therefore his letters in the present collection do not refer to publication of his own work, as the illustrator of Christina's volumes he had occasion to correspond with the publisher fre-

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Rossetti-Macmillan Letters: Some 133 Unpublished Letters Written to Alexander Macmillan, F. S. Ellis, and Others, by Dante Gabriel, Christina, and William Michael Rossetti, 1861-1889
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents xi
  • List of Letters xiii
  • Abbreviations xix
  • Introduction 1
  • The Letters 11
  • Index 159
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 166

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.