The British Political System

By André Mathiot; Jennifer S. Hines | Go to book overview

Chapter Two POLITICAL PARTIES AND THE TWO-PARTY SYSTEM

GREAT BRITAIN is ruled by party government. The rise of political parties and the expansion of their functions is one of the outstanding developments of our age. This has been going on all over the world, and it is possible to trace the development of political parties in the modern sense of the word in Great Britain during the last hundred years. There, however, the principle of party government and the division of the country into two main groups of opinion dates from the constitutional conflicts of the seventeenth century and has been the basis on which the whole of the present machinery of government has been erected. Of all the classic examples of democratic government, the British parliamentary system might be described as the one whose functioning is most dependent upon the party system. The conduct of elections, the formation and survival of Cabinets, and the activities and the very existence of Parliament, have always been almost completely under the control of the political parties. Yet they have never encroached upon the liberties of the individual, and the struggle between the parties has remained entirely free from the bitterness and violence often created and fostered by party 'machines' in other lands.

In this connection, the influence of history has again been important. The political parties and the two-party system, like the constitution which they have done so much to shape and which could not now function without them, have a long history. Their evolution has been a slow and steady process in which the Reform Act of 1832 forms an important landmark. The reform of the electoral system has led the parties to assume their modern characteristics in order to attain empirical political objectives.

The Restoration of 1660 and the accession of Charles II is usually said to mark the emergence of the divisions of opinion

-81-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The British Political System
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 354

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.