PREFACE

IT is generally recognized that at present there is a movement in education away from the Classics. The questions are being raised in the older English Universities, whether after all Greek is a necessary part of every branch of study, and whether it should remain a compulsory subject in every curriculum. In America and in the British Colonies a further stage has been reached. Tradition there has less power; Greek as a compulsory subject has been quite discarded, and Latin itself is in some places a more or less optional subject. The possibilities of danger to education generally which are involved in this attitude toward classical studies need no remark. Yet there is another aspect of the matter which deserves consideration, and here I may be allowed to speak from my own experience.

I found when I was Professor of Latin in a Canadian University a system of 'options' in vogue, which permitted a man, if he so wished, to drop the Classics altogether at a very early stage. The higher study of Latin and Greek was, of course, as in England, a matter of free choice for the student who hoped for honours. But the second of the two pass classes in Latin, involving acquaintance with some half-dozen books, a little unseen translation, and a very little prose composition, could be avoided if a student so determined. Latin, in other words, had to compete with all sorts of subjects, and to stand on its own merits. A curious result followed. Not at all unfrequently a student, in spite of woeful preparation and a persistent inability to' translate with accuracy or to compose without elementary blunders in syntax, would nevertheless realize something of the literary value of the poet or historian who was being read in class, and would persevere with an almost pathetic enthusiasm in a study in which he could hope for no distinction, but

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Studies in Virgil
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 312

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.