CHAPTER VII
THE LAND AND THE NATION. -- 3. AUGUSTUS

Nam genus humanum, defessum vi colere aevom, ex inimicitiis languebat; quo magis ipsum sponte sua ceddit sub leges artaque iura. -- LUCRETIUS, V. 1145.

'For myself,' Goethe continued, 'I have always been a royalist.' GOETHE; Conversations with Eckermann, Feb. 25, 1824.

PROBABLY there is nothing that startles the modern reader of Horace and Virgil so much as the deification of the Emperor Augustus. To us he hardly seems a poetical, still less a divine, figure. A shrewd and successful adventurer, without ideas of his own, he lived by assimilating the ideas of his uncle and adoptive father, while he cautiously discarded, either from inability to grasp them or from a feeling that they would militate against his success, some of those conceptions and thoughts of Julius which most appeal to us to-day. He is essentially the 'middleman' who comes in the train of genius to break up, to distribute, and to utilize those gains which genius can indicate but cannot gather either for itself or for the world. Like other political and intellectual middlemen, he was eminently successful in life, owing his success at once to his practical adroitness and his intellectual inferiority. He stood near enough to Julius to understand his political plans, while he stood nearer than Julius did to the people he had to rule, nearer in the limitation of his outlook, in his slighter power of handling ideas, and in the resulting ability to follow the workings of the average Italian mind. Genius is apt to see too far, and range too high, and look reality too clearly in the face, to sympathize with the pedestrian limitations of its neighbours; and Julius met his death through his mistake in supposing that the men about him were as much moved as he by the logic of realities and as little satisfied with the surfaces of

-137-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Studies in Virgil
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 312

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.