Cicero of Arpinum: A Political and Literary Biography Being a Contribution to the History of Ancient Civilization and a Guide to the Study of Cicero's Writings

By E. G. Sihler | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOUR
THE YOUNG AUTHOR

WHEN Cornelius Cinna ruled Rome and Italy, the republican form and the outward countenance of the commonwealth were unchanged. At the same time there was no genuine government either of the people (whose champion Cinna pretended to be) or of the senate, or of any combination of both. In 86 the consuls were Cinna and Marius; the latter's place was taken by Valerius Flaccus. In 85 the consuls were Cinna and Carbo. In 84 the consuls were likewise Cinna and Carbo. They had themselves returned for two consecutive years as chief magistrates.1 Sulla's laws of 88 B. C. had been formally cancelled. There was even a census in 86. What Lectio Senatus may this have been, when so many heads of the aristocracy were in Sulla's camp? But Cinna ruled in accordance with his own whim and will, and he was extremely cruel besides. (N. D. 3, 81.) The equestrian class meanwhile, the bankers, investors, and promoters, were doubly active at home to recoup themselves for losses consequent upon the temporary occupation of Asia Minor by Mithridates. As a class these financiers in a way stood quite solidly for the new ruler. They must, as practical students of current affairs, have been substantially convinced, more than fairly satisfied, that Sulla would never return or control. They enriched themselves under Cinna's government.2

About this time a distant kinsman of Cicero's attained a kind of fame for his day and time. This was M. Marius Gratidianus, a very zealous and clamorous member of the popular party. The fact that he was twice praetor abundantly proves that he was a satellite of Cinna. A grandmother of Cicero was a Gratidia. One of her nephews was adopted by a Marius, probably a brother of the great Marius. This cousin of Cicero's father thus assumed the most renowned name in all that Arpinatian region and was

____________________
1
Liv. 83: ab se ipsis consules per biennium creati.
2
Ascon. p. 90 Orelli: Equester ordo pro Cinnanis partibus contra Sullam steterat, multasque pecunias abstulerant, ex quo saccularii erant appellati, Lange, 3, 136.

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cicero of Arpinum: A Political and Literary Biography Being a Contribution to the History of Ancient Civilization and a Guide to the Study of Cicero's Writings
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 487

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.