A Guide-Book to the Poetic and Dramatic Works of Robert Browning

By George Willis Cooke | Go to book overview

THE BEST THINGS SAID OF BROWNING.
ONLY the best books and magazine articles about Browning are mentioned in the following lists. No attempt has been made to compile a complete bibliography, but rather to give a helpful guide in finding what is really valuable. Dr. Furnivall's Bibliography is very complete, but not very convenient for ready consultation. What it lacks in conciseness and adaptability for use is made up in the appendix to Sharp's Life. The reader might be referred at once to the latter work were it not that it puts the good and the bad together, and gives little hint of what will be found of value or what is best worth consulting. The names of authors in the following lists guarantee merit; and in the case of writers not well known as critics a careful examination has shown the worth of what is cited.
I. BIOGRAPHICAL BOOKS.
Life of Robert Browning. William Sharp. London: Walter Scott. New York: A. Lovell & Co. 1890.
Robert Browning: Chief Poet of the Age. William G. Kingsland. London: J. W. Jarvis & Son. 1890. Same, revised and enlarged. London: J. W. Jarvis & Son. 1891. Same, revised and enlarged. Philadelphia: Poet-Lore Publishing Co. 1891.
Robert Browning: Personalia. Edmund Gosse. [The Century article of 1881, with a paper published after the death of the poet.) Boston: Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 1890.
Famous Women. Elizabeth Barrett Browning. John H. Ingram. Boston: Robert Brothers. 1888.
Letters of Elizabeth Barrett Browning addressed to Richard Hengist Horne. With a Preface and Memoir by Richard Henry Stoddard. New York: James Millar. 1877.
Last Poems of Elizabeth Barrett Browning. With a Memoir by Theodore Tilton. New York: James Millar. 1862.
The Living Authors of England. Thomas Powell. New York: Appleton & Co. 1849.
A New Spirit of the Age. R. H. Horne. London, 1844.
Six Months in Italy. George Stillman Hillard. Boston, 1853.

-ix-

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A Guide-Book to the Poetic and Dramatic Works of Robert Browning
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface. iii
  • The Best Things Said of Browning. ix
  • Leading Events in Robert Browning's Life. xv
  • A Guide Book To The Writings of Robert Browning. 1
  • Supplement. 441
  • Index. 448
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