A Guide-Book to the Poetic and Dramatic Works of Robert Browning

By George Willis Cooke | Go to book overview

SUPPLEMENT.

Cardinal and the Dog, The. Asolando, 1889. An account of Crescenzio has been discovered in Moreri Dictionnaire Historique, which has been translated as follows:

" Marcel Crescentio, Cardinal Bishop of Marsico, in the kingdom of Naples, was born in Rome, of one of the most noble and ancient families. From his youth he made great progress in letters, particularly in civil and canon law. He had a canonship in the Church of St. Mary Major, and was also given the office of the Auditor of the Rota. Then Pope Clement VII. named him for the bishopric of Marsico, and Pope Paul III. made him Cardinal, June 2, 1542.

" Crescentio was Protector of the Order of Citeaux, perpetual Legate at Bologna, Bishop of Conserans, etc. Julius III. named him Legate to preside at the Council of Trent, and he presided there at the eleventh, twelfth, thirteenth, fourteenth, and fifteenth sessions. The latter ended in 1552, and the Cardinal Crescentio, who was ill, remained in Trent. Rumor said that his malady came upon him in this way: After working almost the whole of the night of March 20 to write to the Pope, as he arose from his seat he imagined that he saw a dog that opened its jaws frightfully, and appeared to him with its flaming eyes and low-hanging ears as if mad, and about to attack him.

" Crescentio called his servants at once, and made them bring lights, but the dog could not be found. The Cardinal, terrified by this spectre, fell into a deep melancholy, and then immediately into a sickness which made him despair of recovery, although his friends and physicians assured him that there was nothing to fear. This is the story about the end of Cardinal Crescentio, who died at Verona the first of June, 1552. It could have been invented only

-441-

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A Guide-Book to the Poetic and Dramatic Works of Robert Browning
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface. iii
  • The Best Things Said of Browning. ix
  • Leading Events in Robert Browning's Life. xv
  • A Guide Book To The Writings of Robert Browning. 1
  • Supplement. 441
  • Index. 448
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