My First Seventy-Six Years: Autobiography

By Hjalmar Horace Greeley Schacht | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWO
Three Towns beginning with 'H'

TINGLEFF, where I was born, is a biggish country village east of Tondern in the mixed German-Danish district. When I was there in 1920 for the plebiscite it was proved that Tingleff was the most northerly village with a German majority. After we lost the first world war the Allies assigned the land beyond the so-called Clausen Line to Denmark: thus it happens that today my native village belongs to Denmark.

My father taught in a private school in Tingleff. The house in which we lived still stands--a little inconspicuous house among many others exactly like it.

The following year we left the little place and moved south to Heide in Dithmarschen, thereby coming full circle--for the Schachts were Dithmarschers, and during the whole of the Middle Ages Heide had been the focal point of this debatable Peasants' Republic. Father said good-bye to the teaching profession and became editor of the Heide News. In addition--since a journalist's career did not carry a sufficient income--he was bookkeeper to Herr Viehdal, a wealthy cloth-merchant who also owned the Heide News. And finally, very reluctantly, he set my mother up in a small haberdashery business where she sold miscellaneous goods, lace, ribbons and thread. True, she did no sensational business, but it all helped, and she did it for my father's sake.

Those were the lean years. Unlike their biblical counterparts there were more than seven of them, and they led us in time to three towns beginning with "H"--Heide, Husum and Hamburg.

The Heide News was liberal-minded and very original. It may be difficult to picture the activities of such a newspaper in the eighteeneighties; modern provincial newspapers obtain almost all of their material, with the exception of local news, ready for press and often actually in matrix from agencies and leading-article syndicates. They no longer represent independent opinion. Even in the Heide News there was plenty of space for local news--church services and markets, the water-level and reports of accidents, festivities and obituaries--but alongside these items there was plenty of thoroughly independent political discussion--politics in general, cultural items, literary criticism--all written by the editor.

-23-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
My First Seventy-Six Years: Autobiography
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 552

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.