My First Seventy-Six Years: Autobiography

By Hjalmar Horace Greeley Schacht | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIXTEEN
The First World War

THE outbreak of war came as a surprise to me as it did to all Germans. Right up to the eleventh hour every reasonable person still believed that the Sarajevo incident would remain a localized affair. Anyone who has read the Memoirs of Sir George Buchanan, British Ambassador in St. Petersburg in 1914, will gather from them that war could have been avoided, even at the last moment, if interested parties had not added fuel to the fire. Only when columns of soldiers came marching down the street, accompanied by cheering and weeping crowds, when the first tidings of disaster reached us from East Prussia and premature news of victory from the West, were we compelled to realize that a war of continental proportions had broken out. What Bismarck had always tried to prevent had come to pass--Germany was fighting on two fronts.

I had no conception of what such a war would be like. Since the day when a military Surgeon-Major had vetted me and rejected me as unfit for service on account of "acute myopia", I had taken no further interest in military doings. My knowledge of warfare was limited to the few descriptions of the campaign of 1870 that I had read as a boy, and to Uncle Wieding's portrayal of the Battle of Idstedt. And that, as everyone knows, was in 1850.

Moreover, there were two institutions of which, all my life, I stood in considerable awe: one was the Military, the other was Officialdom. A captain or a government official to me represented huge beasts who, in some incomprehensible fashion, contrived to make life difficult for civilians.

During the first weeks after the declaration of war it was not possible to determine any economic changes. Financial policy adapted itself easily and smoothly to war conditions. Not until the first year was well under way did more serious problems arise. That was the beginning of never-ending anxieties over raw materials and food supplies; and the steadily rising financial demands of the national economy, which had had to switch over completely to war requirements, gave us bankers many a headache.

Walter Rathenau, later Foreign Minister, was the first to raise the question of raw material supplies. Only then was the official

-130-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
My First Seventy-Six Years: Autobiography
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 552

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.