My First Seventy-Six Years: Autobiography

By Hjalmar Horace Greeley Schacht | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THIRTY-FIVE
The End of Reparations

THE success of my lectures in the neutral countries left me no peace. I had to pursue my campaign of enlightenment right into the headquarters of our most influential political opponent. Ever since the conferences which had been held under the names of Dawes and Young it had become increasingly clear that the United States of America had become the decisive factor, economically and politically, in the destiny of Europe. I was bound to try to win the support of the population for my objective.

My son Jens had expressed the wish to spend a year working in America, so I took the opportunity to make the journey with him and my wife in the autumn of 1930. My friend Melvin Taylor had signified his willingness to take Jens for a year into the First National Bank of Chicago. I answered the enquiry of a New York lecture agency by booking up for some lectures on economic subjects and prepared about a dozen different talks in all.

Elections for the Reichstag were held on the 14th September 1930. I went to the poll in the morning and caught the midday train for London. On our arrival the following morning we were astounded at the result of these elections. The National-Socialist Party, which up till then had had twelve representatives in the Reichstag, had gained no fewer than a hundred and seven seats.

This result could be attributed to one thing only: the steadily worsening economic and social condition of the German people. Hitherto I had taken hardly any notice of the National-Socialist movement. Not only was I very little interested in party politics as such, but my somewhat retired life at Gühlen and my lecture tours meant that I had paid scarcely any heed to Hitler's growing influence.

Now, however, the result of these elections afforded me a welcome opportunity of pointing to the consequences confronting Germany if the misery attendant on the payment of reparations were to be perpetuated. My friends in the City bombarded me with questions and began to give concrete expression on 'Change to their mistrust of economic and political conditions in Germany. Naturally I had no wish to see German credit imperilled. I deliberately and pointedly gave instructions for the purchase of German

-272-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
My First Seventy-Six Years: Autobiography
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 552

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.