The Definition of Moral Virtue

By Yves R. Simon; Vukan Kuic | Go to book overview

6
The Interdependence of Virtues

WE CANNOT CONCLUDE this examination of the nature of moral virtues without saying something about their connection, interconnection, interdependence. Which of these three expressions sounds best? Connection is the simplest, but interdependence is the most graphic. So let us take a look at the interdependence of virtues, by comparing two traditional positions, the Stoic and the Aristotelian.

When I say Aristotelian, I have in mind primarily Aristotle's teaching in the Nicomachean Ethics, but I definitely include also later contributions and developments. I remember Etienne Gilson telling me once that there are no Aristotelians except for Aristotle himself, all others being neo-Platonists, except Thomas Aquinas, who is neither a neo-Platonist nor an Aristotelian but just Aquinas. I listened respectfully, but I did not agree then, and I do not accept that now. It is true that on some subjects, in which Gilson seems particularly interested, Aristotle's views may be unique, but there is also quite a number of philosophical issues on which Aristotle really has a school. I understand Gilson's position. It is the reaction of a serious and competent historian of ideas against the all too common mistake of reading later developments into an earlier source. In the preceding chapter, I mentioned the case of Rodier, who with the best intentions of correcting the prevailing views of psychology tried to turn Aristotle into a nineteenth-century Idealist. This happens all the time, and we must be grateful to men with a real sense for the history of ideas, like Gilson, for warning us against such confusion. Yet his reaction to it, as most reactions are, is in my opinion somewhat overdone. To say, for instance, that Thomas Aquinas is not an Aristotelian obscures rather than clarifies our understanding of historical developments in philosophy. 1 And among the many important issues

-125-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Definition of Moral Virtue
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Editor's Preface vii
  • Yves R. Simon (1903-1961) a Bio-Bibliography ix
  • 1 - Modern Substitutes for Virtue 1
  • Conclusion 15
  • Notes 17
  • 2 - Clearing Up Some Confusions 19
  • Notes 44
  • 3 - Further Necessary Distinctions 47
  • Notes 67
  • 4 - Virtue is Not Science 69
  • Notes 87
  • 5 - The Definition of Moral Virtue 91
  • Notes 119
  • 6 - The Interdependence of Virtues 125
  • Notes 131
  • Index 133
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 144

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.