White's Political Dictionary

By Wilbur W. White | Go to book overview

and the vassal has only such rights as specified in the document establishing this relationship. See SUZERAINTY.

V-E Day. The day of victory in Europe in World War II. It was proclaimed by the United States and Great Britain on May 8, 1945 to go into effect at 12:01 A. M. May 9. The Germans signed a military capitulation in Berlin which the Russians considered the formal end of the war in Europe on the afternoon of May 9.

Venezia Giulia. The easternmost province of northern Italy between World War I and World War II. After World War II most of it, though not including the new Free City of Trieste, was given to Yugoslavia.

Vera Cruz incident. The bombardment and capture of the Mexican port of Vera Cruz by United States naval and marine forces in April, 1914. Victoriano Huerta had just seized the Mexican presidency but was not recognized by the United States. Early in 1914 some United States marines were arrested in Tampico, but quickly released and official apologies were made. However, President Wilson insisted that the American flag be given a salute of 21 guns, and when Mexico refused, the fleet was sent to Vera Cruz. The fall of Huerta in July ended the episode. See ABC POWERS.

verdict. The conclusion of the jury on the facts presented to it in a case in court.

Verdun. A French fortress-city at which the Germans attempted to break through the Allied lines in 1916. The Germans launched a tremendous attack in February and they were not driven out of all the important areas around the city until the following December. The French were commanded by General Henri- Philippe Pétain who coined the famous phrase "They shall not pass." (Ils ne passeront pas.)

Versailles Treaty. Allied-German peace treaty signed at Versailles, near Paris, on June 28, 1919. It consisted of 15 parts, and the most important provisions were: I. Covenant of the League of Nations. II. Boundaries of Germany, giving Posen and the Polish Corridor to Poland, Alsace- Lorraine to France, small areas to Belgium. The Saar valley and Danzig were put under the League, and Germany agreed to plebiscites in Upper Silesia, North Schleswig and two other small areas. III. Austrian independence was recognized, the Rhineland demilitarized and the Saar coal mines given to France. IV. Germany's colonies were made mandates of the League. V. Germany was disarmed, her army limited to 100,000 men and her navy to a few old ships, and the General Staff abolished. VII. Emperor William II was to be tried by the five largest Allies. VIII. War guilt was accepted by Germany, and her reparations outlined. XII. The Rhine, Elbe and Oder rivers were put under international control. XIII. The International Labor Organization was established. XIV. The Rhineland was to be occupied by the Allies for 15 years, or longer if Germany defaulted on its obligations under the treaty. The treaty went into force on January 10, 1920 but was not ratified by the United States. Peace between the United States and Germany was effected by the America-German Peace Treaty of 1921.

vested interests. Well-established largescale economic interests which influence political action in favor of their own good.

Veterans Administration. An independent United States government

-305-

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White's Political Dictionary
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Preface 5
  • A 9
  • C 46
  • D 83
  • G 121
  • H 130
  • K 152
  • L 161
  • M 175
  • N 191
  • O 203
  • Q 236
  • R 238
  • T 252
  • U 297
  • W. 305
  • X - Y 321
  • Z 322
  • Appendix I Charter of the United Nations 325
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