White's Political Dictionary

By Wilbur W. White | Go to book overview

X - Y

xenophobia. Extreme dislike of foreign things and particularly persons.

Yalta Conference. See CRIMEA CONFERENCE.

yeas and nays. A vote in a legislative body in which the members vote separately and the various votes are recorded.

Yellow Book. Name of the French governmental reports of investigating or other committees. See BLUE BOOK.

"yellow-dog" contract. An employeremployee contract in which the latter agrees not to join a labor union; now illegal.

yellow-seal dollar. A dollar bill used by the United States Army as currency for the occupation forces when Italy was invaded. It was a silver certificate on which the regular blue seal was engraved in yellow. The purpose was to provide an occupation currency that would not be directly exchangeable with regular United States currency.

yellow peril. The threat to the white race created by the size of the yellow race. The fact is, however, that in recent years there have been wars within the yellow race as within the white race, rather than a pure racial conflict.

Young Officers. The Japanese Imperial League of Young Officers. A group of army officers in the vanguard of Japanese imperialism, which was responsible for forcing the government to accede to its wishes, often by means of revolt and assassination particularly in February, 1936.

Young Plan. The second major change in the German World War I reparations, drawn up in 1929 and finally agreed to January 20, 1930. It reduced the German reparations to 26 ⅟2 billion dollars, payable in 60 years, abolished the reparations commission, and provided for the establishment of the Bank for International Settlements. The name came from that of the United States representative, Owen D. Young. See DAWES PLAN.

Young Turks. Revolutionary group in Turkey which took shape prior to 1900 and seized power July 23, 1908. The sultan started a counter-revolution the following April but in a short time the Young Turks were again in control.

yuan. Chinese name for each of five councils established by the Constitution of 1946, and also for the buildings in which they meet. See CHINESE CONSTITUTION OF 1946.

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White's Political Dictionary
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Preface 5
  • A 9
  • C 46
  • D 83
  • G 121
  • H 130
  • K 152
  • L 161
  • M 175
  • N 191
  • O 203
  • Q 236
  • R 238
  • T 252
  • U 297
  • W. 305
  • X - Y 321
  • Z 322
  • Appendix I Charter of the United Nations 325
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