Britain between the Wars, 1918-1940

By Charles Loch Mowat | Go to book overview
Contents
ChapterPage
1. BACKWARDS OR FORWARDS? 1918-19201
1. 'Not perhaps the golden age.'
2. The 'Coupon' Election.
3. The Coalition Leaders .
4. The new Leviathan.
5. The passion of Labour .
6. The winter of our discontent .
7. Boom and inflation .
8. Decontrol .
9. The foiling of Labour.
10. The placating of Labour .
11. Strikes and the threat of strikes.
12. Socialism by the back door .
13. The Paris Peace Conference.
14. The aftermath: diplomatic and military.
15. Ireland: the war of the I.R.A. and the Black and Tans.
16. The partition of Ireland .
2. RETRENCHMENT, 1920-192279
1. The war in Ireland: the last phase .
2. Prelude to a truce.
3. Truce and pause .
4. Negotiating a treaty .
5. The debate over the treaty .
6. The rift widens .
7. Civil war.
8. The Irish Free State and the boundary .
9. The changing empire.
10. Eclipse of Lloyd George's policies in Europe.
11. Chanak .
12. Another coal crisis: Black Friday.
13. The slump and unemployment: the dole is born.
14. The economy drive .
15. The crisis in party politics.
16. The fall of the Coalition .
3. COMING TO REST: 1922-1925143
1. The return of the Conservatives .
2. The tramp of Labour.
3. The patchwork of peace in Europe .
4. Bald1win becomes Prime Minister.
5. Baldwin's strategy: the election of 1923.
6. A Labour government in being .
7. The Labour government's record .
8. MacDonald, the peacemaker.
9. The government's sudden fall .
10. The 1924 election and the Red scare.
11. Post mortem on the Zinoviev letter.
12. Baldwin and the return to normalcy; Locarno and the gold standard.
4. STABILITY AND CHANGE: THE CONDITION OF BRITAIN IN THE TWENTIES. 201
1. The ringing grooves of change .
2. The old order changeth.
3. The distribution of the national income .
4. Education: the cautious approach .
5. Eat, drink and be merry.
6. New styles, new themes .
7. The advancement and dispersal of knowledge.
8. The Church and the

-vii-

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