Britain between the Wars, 1918-1940

By Charles Loch Mowat | Go to book overview

CHAPTER EIGHT
Sitting it Out: Economic Recovery and Political Apathy, 1931-1935

1. THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT

THE history of the National government was one long diminuendo. From its triumph in 1931 it shambled its unimaginative way to its fall in 1940, when the failure of the campaign in Norway and the Nazi invasion of the Low Countries brought Great Britain to the crisis of the new world war. Its origin was an emergency which was financial and domestic; its tasks were to overcome a series of catastrophes which were international and military. Its responses were not bold. It retreated before aggression; it rearmed, but at first too slowly. In fact it was not unsuccessful in its economic policies but fatally narrow in its political conduct. Failure in the latter sphere darkened' its reputation in the former; in retrospect it has been blamed for all the misfortunes of the time, partly because its opponents rose to power by reiterating their version of its history and its period.

The mood of the early thirties was not heroic. Gone was the hopeful internationalism of the twenties, the return to the gold standard, the restoration of world trade. Britain, beset by depression, turned inward, like every other country, and concentrated on internal problems and domestic solutions. In time the mood changed, but the government remained the same; 1935 was the year of decision. Other countries might have new and adventurous governments: Germany the Third Reich, France the Popular Front, the United States the New Deal, Russia another Five-Year Plan. Only in Britain did the Conservatives remain in power; hence the Second World War, restoring conservatism in other countries, could only dethrone it in Great Britain.

That the National government was in harmony with the national mood could not be doubted. MacDonald and Baldwin, having alternated in office in the twenties, shared it in the thirties, and combined their talents for calming the passions and rubbing

-413-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Britain between the Wars, 1918-1940
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 694

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.