Daniel Webster as an Economist

By Robert Lincoln Carey | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
OPINIONS ON PARTICULAR PROBLEMS

1. PUBLIC DOMAIN

HAVING discussed certain general principles which guided Webster's conduct with respect to public revenue, expenditure, and credit and their problems, a brief survey of his opinions upon a few significant public issues may further demonstrate his contributions to American economic thought and development. One of the great questions which engaged his attention was the disposition of the public domain. He always considered the western lands as a common fund belonging to the whole people and not to the residents of the separate states and, partly for this reason and partly because he believed Congress was assigned by the Constitution to the duty of trusteeship of the domain, resisted every attempt to cede the land to the states. On this issue, he was at odds with Calhoun who tried to induce Congress to transfer title to the domain to various states in the south and west.

Early in his public career, he assumed a definite position upon the problem of retention versus alienation of the domain. In 1825, he committed himself unequivocally in favor of disposition, considering it an unwise policy to hoard it as a treasure for the purpose of meeting the needs of the exchequer. However, he was a moderate alienationist, favoring a policy of accelerating the sale of lands to dissatisfied industrial workers of the east and to pioneers generally by the stimulus of low prices, but not so low as to tempt speculators into the market. His point of view was both fiscal and social,

-181-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Daniel Webster as an Economist
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 222

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.