Arthur Honegger

By Harry Halbreich; Roger Nichols | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

These are so numerous that I am certain to forget some, for which I apologize in advance. The most important of them figure in the dedication, but there are very many others.

First of all, to my friends at Éditions Salabert, Nelly Boufathal, Jeremy Drake, Radu Stan, and Costin Miereanu, who have generously placed at my disposal all the printed and manuscript scores in their possession, who have given me open access to their archives, and lastly who have given my publisher permission to reproduce the numerous music examples from works that they own. The only exceptions to this are the following, for which I also thank the respective owners/publishers. They too have given me all the help I asked for:

Éditions Max Eschig (La Sirène) for Examples 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 19, 20, and 21; Éditions Foetisch (Lausanne) for Examples 107, 108, 109, 110, 133, 134, and 135; Éditions Heugel (Leduc) for Examples 146, 152, and 153; Éditions Le Chant du Monde for Example 157; Editions Josette France for example 164; Chester Music ( London) for Example 25; Éditions Choudens for Example 105; Universal Edition ( Vienna) for Example 147. Examples 154, 155, 157, 158, 165, and 166 are unpublished and belong to Pascale Honegger.

My thanks also go to my principal research centers -- beyond the most important of them, the home of Pascale Honegger -- for their kindness and efficiency: to the Bibliothèque nationale, its annex the Phonothèque nationale, the Bibliothèque de l'Arsenal, and the Bibliothèque de Radio-France (all in Paris), and the Paul Sacher Foundation in Basel. I cannot, unfortunately, say the same for the National Audiovisual Institute (INA) in Paris, which, though rich in material, imposes such exorbitant conditions, even on those who merely wish to consult it, that they discourage the majority of researchers, as I discovered. I say this in the hope of getting the present state of affairs changed.

On the other hand, I received the most polite and friendly welcome at the Cinémathèque française, at the Service des Archives du Film (Centre national de la cinèmatographie) in Bois d'Arcy, at the Musée du cinema in Brussels, at the Cinémathèque suisse in Lausanne (where I should also like personally to thank the enthusiastic and dynamic director, Freddy Buache), and, last but not least, at the Fondation Armand Panigel in Saint-Rémy de Provence. There I was able to see all the films for which Honegger wrote music -- or at least those that have survived, which is to say four-fifths of them. I am certainly not for-

-11-

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