Arthur Honegger

By Harry Halbreich; Roger Nichols | Go to book overview

THREE

Six or Swiss? From Le Dit des jeux du monde
to Le Roi David

Arthur Honegger came to the conclusion that the orchestra put at his disposal by the Théâtre du Vieux-Colombier was not big enough for the Saint-Pol Roux project, so he spent the time at Étel in August 1918 working on an Easter Mystery for the same theater. He was still mentioning this project in October, but it never came to fruition. What does survive is the Cantique de Pâques ( Easter Canticle ), which he finished in July before leaving Paris, but which he did not orchestrate until November 1922. This single relic of the Ochsé project is a modest work for female chorus and small orchestra, still very much under the influence of Debussy. As his first choral and religious work, it marks an important step along the road leading to Le Roi David.

At the same time Honegger was getting on with the long score of Le Dit des jeux du monde, which was scheduled for first performance at the end of October. In August he finished Nos. 5 and 6, which had been begun in Paris, and started work on No. 2, "La montagne et les pierres" (The Mountain and the Stones); No. 7, "Les hommes et la terre" (Man and the Earth), initially entitled "Les lances et la terre" (Spears and the Earth); and No. 9 "L'homme qui lutte et conduit" (Man Who Struggles and Leads, or Interlude 2). Movement No. 8, "L'homme et la femme" (Man and Woman), is dated July-August, and Honegger wrote it at Sauzon in Belle-Ile. The wild scenery there so inspired the composer, after the more tranquil charms of Étel, that in August and September he also wrote No. 11, "Le rat et la mort" (The Rat and Death). Movement No. 1, "Le soleil et la fleur" (The Sun and the Flower), is undated. That left Nos. 3, 10, 12, and 13 still to write, and he did this in Paris, to which he returned at the beginning of September. That month he completed No. 3, "L'enfant et la mer" (The Child and the Sea); then, in October, No. 10, "L'homme et l'ombre" (Man and the Shadow), and No. 13, the Epilogue; and finally, between the end of October and 6 November, the longest movement, No. 12, "L'homme et la mer" (Man and the Sea). A month earlier, on 6 October, he had sent his father one of the longest of all his letters.

My dear Papa,

I had intended to get myself organized well in advance, so that this letter would reach you in time for your birthday despite the censor, closed frontiers, and other small delights. The reason it hasn't happened is the 'flu

-53-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Arthur Honegger
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 677

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.