Literature and Psychoanalysis

By Edith Kurzweil; William Phillips | Go to book overview

of art, escape-art, for man needs escape as he needs food and deep sleep, and parable-art, that art which shall teach man to unlearn hatred and learn love, which can enable Freud to say with greater conviction:

We may insist as often as we please that the human intellect is powerless when compared with the impulses of man, and we may be right in what we say. All the same there is something peculiar about this weakness. The voice of the intellect is soft and low, but it is persistent and continues until it has secured a hearing. After what may be countless repetitions, it does get a hearing. This is one of the few facts which may help to make us rather more hopeful about the future of mankind.


Notes
1.
But not the first. The Elizabethans used madness, not as a subject for clinical description but as opportunity for a particular kind of associational writing (e.g., Lear or The Duchess of Malfi). Something of the kind occurs even earlier in the nonsense passages in the mummer's play.
2.
For example, the sale of popular textbooks on economics since 1929.
3.
The success of the youngest son in folk tales is instructive. He is generally his mother's favorite as physically weaker and less assertive than his brothers. If he is often called stupid, his stupidity is physical. He is clumsy and lazy rather than dull. (Clumsiness being due to the interference of fancies with sense data.) He succeeds partly out of good nature and partly because confronted with a problem he overcomes it by understanding rather than with force.
4.
The difference between the two unconscious minds is expressed symbolically in dreams, e.g., motor cars and manufactured things express the personal unconscious, horses, etc., the impersonal.

-131-

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