Literature and Psychoanalysis

By Edith Kurzweil; William Phillips | Go to book overview

18.
Psychoanalytic Notes on Franz Kafka

Margarete Mitscherlich-Nielsen

TO MANY OF FRANZ KAFKA'S READERS his works seem strangely "abstracted," like exact and detailed descriptions of a world that yet remains oddly remote. Had Kafka been a writer of less extraordinary gifts, he could not have found images and descriptive devices for processes that so many people sense obscurely within themselves; one would probably shrink back from his texts with their depictions of cruelty, torture, and desolation.

A great deal of research has been done and a great deal written about Kafka. Much of the interest he provokes is prompted by the contradiction between the gentleness of the person and his excursions into cruel fantasies. The considerations I offer here may help to explain this puzzling ambiguity; they certainly do not claim to impart defintive insights. At most they are reflections on the ways in which individual and collective traumata may have influenced the course of Kafka's life and the development of his talent. In this essay, I have been concerned mainly with his biography and have drawn on his letters and diaries and on his

From paper presented to the Freiburg Psychoanalytisches Seminar in 1976 and originally published in Psyche ( 1977), no. 31, pp. 60-83; also in Psychocultural Review ( 1979), 3 (1):1- 24. Translated by Beverley R. Placzek. Copyright © 1979 Margarete Mitscherlich-Nielsen. Reprinted by permission.

-270-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Literature and Psychoanalysis
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 403

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.