Mystery and Method: The Other in Rahner and Levinas

By Michael Purcell | Go to book overview

ENDNOTES
1
The omission of the "thus" from Carr's quotation is deliberate and important, for knowledge of human persons and their world is not the fruit of philosophical analysis but the seed.
2
One can note here that, ultimately, both the Metaphysical method and the Transcendental Method as employed in Rahner's Maréchalian transcendentalism have the same concern for objectivity. In the metaphysical critique the ontological affirmation of being -- the metaphysical object -- is taken for granted; in the transcendental critique it is to be transcendentally deduced from the phenomenal object. Maréchal writes, "Car la Critique ancienne pose d'emblée l'Objet ontologique, qui inclut le Sujet transcendentale, et la Critique moderne s'attache au Sujet transcendentale, qui postule l'Objet ontologique" ( Maréchal 1949, 69).
3
See F Kerr 1986, 10-14.
4
It is this "structure of all questioning" which needs further consideration when one approaches Rahner. Rahner views the question as the only 'must' of human existence, the one fact which refuses to be dispersed by thought. Rahner, beginning from the fact of the question in human existence, undertakes a transcendental reflection to uncover its conditions of possibility. Levinas, however, provides a deeper reflection which recognises that the question is not the first datum of human existence but enjoys a position of secondarity which respect to a prior inter-personal context.
5
Smith wishes "to show the sui generis character of Levinas' nontheoretical yet genuinely philosophical argument, and -- because I take 'rationality' to be the conception of last resort governing the demands for justification that may be directed to a philosophy -- to elucidate the implications for philosophy of the 'rationality' that Levinas proposes, and that his achievement presupposes" ( Smith 1986, 53). For Levinas, says Smith, reason is governed by the understanding of intersubjectiviry laid out in Totality and Infinity and Otherwise than Being.
6
Vasey notes that, in his most recent writings, Levinas goes beyond the notion of intentionality, and in Otherwise than Being abandons expressions such as "incarnate intentionality," the "intentionality of enjoyment" and "affective intentionality," reserving the term only for the Husserlian notion of intentionality. The origin of the possibility of thematisation lies much deeper than incarnate intentionality; it derives from the experience of proximity which is "a relation which pre-exists the relations that consciousness of... establishes, it pre-exists the noetico-noematic structure of intentionality" (ibid. p. 186).
7
For a fuller discussion of the relationship between life and awakening, with particular reference to the doctrine of grace in Rahner interpreted in the light of Levinas, see M Purcell, "Goria Dei, Homo Vigilans: Waking up to Grace in Rahner and Levinas," Louvain Studies, 21, (Autumn, 1996), 229-60.

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Mystery and Method: The Other in Rahner and Levinas
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Introduction xii
  • Endnotes xxxiii
  • 1. Method 1
  • 1.7 Summary 56
  • Endnotes 59
  • 2 Philosophical Origins 119
  • Endnotes 121
  • 3. Questioning Presence 129
  • 3.5 Summary 166
  • Endnotes 169
  • 4. Subjectivity and Alterity 171
  • 5. Desiring the Other Or, the Prevenience of Grace 223
  • 5-5 Summary 246
  • Endnotes 248
  • 6 the Sacramentality of the Face, Or, Sacramental Signification 251
  • Endnotes 294
  • 7. Being Ethical 297
  • Endnotes 333
  • 8 the Mystery of the Other 335
  • Endnotes 357
  • Bibliography 359
  • Index 383
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