The Character of God: Recovering the Lost Literary Power of American Protestantism

By Thomas E. Jenkins | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter One
1.
Walter Lippmann, A Preface to Morals ( 1929; reprint, New Brunswick, N.J.: Transaction Publishers, 1989), p. 97; [ Whittaker Chambers], "Faith for a Lenten Age," Time 51 ( March 8, 1948): 70; Stanley Hauerwas, Dispatches from the Front: Theological Engagements with the Secular ( Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1994). It should be noted that all of these authors recognized the importance of art and literature for religious expression. Lippmann, for instance, explored the "disappearence of religious painting" and the difficulty of the modern writer working without a religious tradition ( Preface to Morals, pp. 94-111). Chambers's article contained a reproduction of a William Blake picture of God, and Chambers cited the work of Dostoyevsky ( "Faith for a Lenten Age," pp. 70-71). Central to Hauerwas's project has been "narrative theology," a late twentieth-century theological development that examines the ethical and epistemological complexity that can be conveyed through fictional, biblical, and other kinds of narratives. In Dispatches from the Front, Hauerwas used novels by Anthony Trollope and Anne Tyler to explore the moral agenda he proposed for theology (pp. 31-88).
2.
On the emergence of a secular print culture, see Richard D. Brown, Knowledge Is Power: The Diffusion of Information in Early America, 1700-1865 ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1989); Larzer Ziff, Writing in the New Nation: Prose, Print, and Politics in the Early United States ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1991); Cathy N. Davidson, Revolution and the World: The Rise of the Novel in America ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1986), pp. 15-37; and Lawrence Buell, New England Literary Culture: From Revolution through Renaissance ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986), pp. 56-83. On the appropriation of popular culture for religious ends in the nineteenth century, see Nathan Hatch, The Democratization of American Christianity ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1989). Jon Butler sees the efforts of evangelists as less egalitarian than Hatch and sets the process of "Christianizing the American people" in a larger spiritual context, including popular interest in magic. See Jon Butler, A wash in a Sea of Faith: Christianizing the American People ( Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1990). On the use of popular literature and advertising techniques in popular religion in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, see R. Laurence Moore , Selling God: American Religion in the Marketplace of Culture ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1994). In the seventeenth and the early eighteenth century, of course, Puri-

-205-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Character of God: Recovering the Lost Literary Power of American Protestantism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 280

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.