Voodoo Science: The Road from Foolishness to Fraud

By Robert L. Park | Go to book overview

SIX PERPETUUM MOBILE In Which People Dream of Infinite Free Energy

THE RETURN OF JOB NEWMAN

"WELL, THE PACE OF technological change is breathtaking these days, isn't it?" Dan Rather asked rhetorically on the CBS Evening News. "Now a backyard tinkerer in Mississippi says he's built a machine, a kind of perpetual motion machine, that defies the laws of physics -- and you know, some people think that just maybe he has. Bill Whitaker has taken a look at it." I couldn't believe it. It was March 11, 1987, more than three years since CBS first visited Joe Newman and his Energy Machine. Just when it looked like he had finally run out of energy, CBS was giving him another jump start!

Bill Whitaker caught up with Newman in Biloxi, Mississippi, standing beside the red Sterling sports car. The script had hardly changed from three years earlier. "It was hard for newsmen to know whether they were witnessing a technological farce

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