Azhar, and the teachers, the sheikhs, ulemas, and. tutors, are counted by hundreds. Its constituency, like those of the European universities in the Middle Ages, is cosmopolitan rather than national: it draws its pupils from every part of the three continents in which orthodox Mussulmans dwell. Even as students used to come from Scandinavia and Sicily to Paris and Göttingen, so they now flock to El-Azhar from all the lands of the Prophet. There are Syrians, Moors, Algerians, Turks, Tunisians, Bosnians from the Adriatic, and Mongols from near the Pacific, Afghans, Punjabis, Abyssinians and Somalis, blue-eyed Circassians, and ebon-hued negroes. It is a microcosm of Mohammedanism, a museum of those various populations--white, brown, yellow, and black--who are the children of Islam. There is no place like it anywhere, and nothing in Cairo better worth seeing.

I waited outside in the mud of the squalid lane, while the guardians of the gate inspected the letter of introduction I had brought with me from the Sheikh Ahmed El-Azhary, the head of the Wakfs bureau, a, learned doctor in Moslemism and likewise an enlightened administrator who knows and admires the ways of the English. My credentials being found sufficient, I was invited to put felt slippers over my boots, and thereupon conducted through the maze of vast courts and wide corridors. The place is confusing owing to its size and the mass of humanity which crowds every inch of the enormous floor space. It is

-203-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Egypt in Transition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Introduction vii
  • Note by the Author xxi
  • Contents xxiii
  • Egypt in Transition Chapter I - The Desert Train 1
  • Chapter II - A City of Romance 9
  • Chapter III - The Growing of Khartum 19
  • Chapter IV Omdurman 31
  • Chapter V Anglo-Sudanese Society 40
  • Chapter VI Concerning Politics and Persons 51
  • Chapter VII Some Sudanese Problems 62
  • Chapter VIII Simpkinson Bey 74
  • Chapter IX - Concerning Women, Soldiers, and Civilians 84
  • Chapter X The New Gate of Africa 93
  • Chapter XII A Nocturne 111
  • Chapter XIII A Sudan Plantation 120
  • Chapter XIV Land and Water 132
  • Chapter XV The Bridle of the Flood 141
  • Chapter XVI The Clients of Cook 153
  • Chapter XVII The Hills of the Dead 162
  • Chapter XVIII Cairo Impressions 169
  • Chapter XIX 179
  • Chapter XX Mr. Vaporopoulos 192
  • Chapter XXI - The Schools of the Prophet 202
  • Chapter XXII - The Occupation 212
  • Chapter XXIII 223
  • Chapter XXV Halting Justice 242
  • Chapter XVII Some Recent Reforms 253
  • Chapter XXVII The Drag on the Wheel 270
  • Chapter XXVIII Conclusions 286
  • Index 311
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 325

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.