CHAPTER XXVII
THE DRAG ON THE WHEEL

THE regeneration of Egypt is still hampered by the fetters clamped upon the country in the past. The Khedivial Government and its English advisers have to carry on their administrative and reforming duties under the vexatious international restrictions from which they have not yet succeeded in disembarrassing themselves. Even if the Legislative Assembly were clothed with the fullest parliamentary prerogatives, as we understand them in Western communities, it could not be a 'sovereign' legislature; it could not pass laws which would be enforced throughout Egypt and bind all its inhabitants; nor can the Khedive and his Council of Ministers; nor could the British Government if it so far departed from all its practices and professions as to make the attempt. For Egypt is still held in the clutch of the Mixed Tribunals and the Capitulations; and though she has now, under the Anglo-French Convention of 1904, almost resumed her financial and economic freedom, she remains in humiliating tutelage as regards the administration of justice and the exercise both of legislative and executive authority. The horde of foreigners and foreign

-270-

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Egypt in Transition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Introduction vii
  • Note by the Author xxi
  • Contents xxiii
  • Egypt in Transition Chapter I - The Desert Train 1
  • Chapter II - A City of Romance 9
  • Chapter III - The Growing of Khartum 19
  • Chapter IV Omdurman 31
  • Chapter V Anglo-Sudanese Society 40
  • Chapter VI Concerning Politics and Persons 51
  • Chapter VII Some Sudanese Problems 62
  • Chapter VIII Simpkinson Bey 74
  • Chapter IX - Concerning Women, Soldiers, and Civilians 84
  • Chapter X The New Gate of Africa 93
  • Chapter XII A Nocturne 111
  • Chapter XIII A Sudan Plantation 120
  • Chapter XIV Land and Water 132
  • Chapter XV The Bridle of the Flood 141
  • Chapter XVI The Clients of Cook 153
  • Chapter XVII The Hills of the Dead 162
  • Chapter XVIII Cairo Impressions 169
  • Chapter XIX 179
  • Chapter XX Mr. Vaporopoulos 192
  • Chapter XXI - The Schools of the Prophet 202
  • Chapter XXII - The Occupation 212
  • Chapter XXIII 223
  • Chapter XXV Halting Justice 242
  • Chapter XVII Some Recent Reforms 253
  • Chapter XXVII The Drag on the Wheel 270
  • Chapter XXVIII Conclusions 286
  • Index 311
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