Madrid 1900: The Capital as Cradle of Literature and Culture

By Michael Ugarte | Go to book overview

5
Madrid, Capital of Bohemia: Ramoón María del Valle-Inclán

In the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, when the gypsies of the kingdom of Bohemia traveled from what is today the Czech Republic through the Austro-Hapsburg Empire into France, they probably had no idea that their culture would become a romantic ideal for Western artists and intellectuals. But by the turn of the nineteenth century, the European city had converted Bohemia into a state of mind. What we commonly define as "Bohemian," the vagabond-artist's taste for the unconventional and a disdain for material riches, remains a literary phenomenon. Among the earliest manifestations is Henry Merger Scènes de la vie Bohème ( 1861), which later became the material for Puccini's famous opera. For Murger and Puccini, as well as for the many poets, painters, playwrights, and novelists who called themselves "Bohemian" in the early twentieth century, Bohemia was essentially and vitally urban.

The setting for both Murger Scènes and for Puccini La Bohème (first performed in 1896) was the Latin Quarter of Paris, and without this geographical and sociological reality, neither work would be complete. The city provided the Bohemians with the subject matter of their art as well as with spiritual (if not material) sustenance. In the opening scene of the opera, the poverty-stricken artists, Rodolfo and Marcello, sing the sorrows of the harsh winter in Paris while they watch the smoke rise from the surrounding chimneys as their straitlaced neighbors enjoy the warmth of their hearths. Rodolfo declares, "Love is a stove that consumes too much. . . . But meanwhile we're freezing." And Marcello

-131-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Madrid 1900: The Capital as Cradle of Literature and Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Reading Madrid's History 25
  • 2 - Urban Sociology and Narrative: Pío Baroja 51
  • 3 - Feminist Madrid: Carmen De Burgos 79
  • 4 - Things of the City: Ramón Gómez De La Serna 105
  • 5 - Madrid, Capital of Bohemia: Ramoón María Del Valle-Inclán 131
  • 6 - Madrid's Grand Country Bumpkin: Azorín 157
  • Conclusion: Madrid City Limits 185
  • Select Bibliography 189
  • Index 199
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 203

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.