Painting in England 1700-1850: Collection of Mr. & Mrs. Paul Mellon

By Basil Taylor | Go to book overview

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX
THE NUMBERS AFTER EACH BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE REFER TO THE CATALOGUE NUMBERS
AGASSE Jacques Laurent 1767 Geneva-London 1849 The son of a Huguenot aristocrat, Agasse is said first to have studied animals in his father's stable. He worked under David and Horace Vernet in Paris and first visited England about 1790 in company with his friend and patron, the Hon. George Pitt (afterwards Lord Rivers). He returned to London in 1800 after the French occupation of Geneva and settled with the Chalon family. He remained in England until his death, painting portraits, landscape and genre pictures as well as a wide variety of animal and sporting subjects. In 1821 he was commissioned by the Royal College of Surgeons to make six paintings illustrating theories of heredity and breeding in the horse. 283351352384
ALKEN Henry Thomas 1785 London-London1841 The most famous of four generations of artists, his grandfather being a carver, his father an architect and engraver, two of his brothers and two of his sons sporting artists. He studied first with his father, Samuel Alken, and afterwards with a miniaturist named Beaumont. His work consists of a large body of paintings, drawings and etchings not only of British and foreign sports but of the manners and customs of his time. He is best known for his studies of fox-hunting. His publications included The Beauties and Defects in the Figure of the Horse comparatively delineated (1816), Sporting Sketches (1817), National Sports of Great Britain (1820); he also illustrated the writings of Charles James Apperley (Nimrod'). 353
BARENGER James 1780 London-London1831 The son of a painter and glazier Barenger was also the nephew of the engraver William Woollett. He exhibited forty pictures at the Royal Academy between 1807 and 1831, these works being either animal portraits or sporting subjects. 350
BARKER Thomas 1769 Pontypool-Bath1847 The son of Benjamin Barker (died 1793) an animal painter, his talent was encouraged, when the family moved to Bath, by a wealthy coach-builder who supported him, gave him the opportunity to copy old Dutch and Flemish pictures and later sent him to Rome for four years. On his return in 1793 he settled in Bath where he concentrated mainly on landscape and rustic scenes with occasional portraits and scriptural subjects. In 1813 and 1814 he published two series of lithographs in colour of rustic figures and landscape scenery. His paintings of subjects such as these were very popular in his lifetime being much engraved and copied on to pottery and textiles. His painting The Trial of Queen Caroline, figuring many of the eminent men of the day was a great success and in the last prosperous period of his career he made a large fresco in his house in Bath. The Inroads of the Turks upon Scio'. 49
BARLOW Francis c. 1626 Lincolnshire-London1702 According to Vertue, Barlow, on coming to London, became a pupil of 'W. Shepherd a face-painter'. His surviving paintings are mainly large decorative pieces devoted to animals, game and sporting subjects in the manner of Hondius and Hondecoeter. He was a prolific draughtsman and many of his drawings were engraved either by himself or by Hollar, Place and other lesser known engravers. He made designs for Aesop's Fables (1665) Several Ways of Hunting, Hawking and Fishing according to the English Manner ( 1671) and for his Divers Species of Birds. 389
BARRET George Snr. R.A. 1732? Dublin-London1784 The son of a clothier, he was employed there colouring prints of a publisher, studied in an academy in the city and also may have been a drawing master. Edmund Burke introduced him to the Earl of Powers - court, an early patron. He came to London in 1762 and was immediately successful but in spite of the high prices of his pictures became bankrupt. Through Burke's influence he became a drawing master to Chelsea Hospital. His most important works were decoration for Norbury Park. He was one of the founder members of the Royal Academy. 338444
BLAKE William 1757 London-London1827 The son of a hosier who encouraged his early interest in drawing, Blake was apprenticed in 1777 to the engraver James Basire, remaining with him for seven years. He also worked for a brief period at the Royal Academy Schools and in 1780 showed a picture in the exhibition. A year after his marriage in 1782 he published his first volume of poetry. In 1784 he set up in business as a print seller and engraver, publishing in 1787 his Songs of Innocence. And during the next seven years other publications followed, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell (1790), The Gates of Paradise, The Vision of the Daughters of Albion and other prophetic books ( 1793) and Songs of Experience ( 1794). In 1796 he illustrated Young's Night Thoughts in connection with which he made altogether 537 watercolour drawings. At this period he met the poet William Hayley, who invited Blake to settle at Felpham where he lived for three years. On his return he published the prophetic books called Jerusalem, The Emanation of the Giant Albion, and Milton. In 1808 appeared his illustrations to Robert Blair's poem The Grave. In 1818 he met John Linnell and during the last years of his life was the centre of a small circle of painters and admirers, such as John Varley, George Richmond, Edward Calvert, Samuel Palmer and others. The chief work of his last years was the series of drawings and engraved designs for the Book of Job, and for Dante Divine Comedy. 380381382383387
BONINGTON Richard Parkes 1802 Arnold-London1828 When about fifteen years old Bonington emigrated to Calais with his father who planned to erect a lace-making factory there. Having shown some

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Painting in England 1700-1850: Collection of Mr. & Mrs. Paul Mellon
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 5
  • Foreword 7
  • Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Board of Trustees 9
  • Catalogue 31
  • Gallery Plan 35
  • Gallery 1 37
  • Gallery 2 64
  • Gallery 5 106
  • Gallery 6 118
  • Gallery 7 127
  • Gallery 8 148
  • Gallary 10 165
  • Gallery 12 184
  • Gallery 13 193
  • Additions 209
  • Biographical Index - The Numbers After Each Biographical Note Refer to the Catalogue Numbers 214
  • Concordance 231
  • Errata 232
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